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July 16, 2019 - July 22, 2019
Editor(s): Amanda Bennett
  1. Author(s):

    ...Another hot week before a trend toward normal...

    This week will be marked by hot and humid conditions with rains later Tuesday into Wednesday from the remnants of Barry. Most places will likely see 0.50-1.00 inches but even with Barry going by the rainfall will be highly variable with some areas getting less than 0.50 inches and others getting over 2.00 inches.

  2. Author(s):

    Spray drift not only results in wasting expensive pesticides and pollution of the environment, it may damage non-target crops nearby, and poses a serious health risk to people living in areas where drift is occurring. Drift happens! It accounts for about half of all non-compliance cases investigated by the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

  3. Author(s):

    Two new factsheets summarizing key components of the work to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations are now available.

    Updated Grain Nutrient Removal Rates

    How many pounds of nutrients are removed with every bushel of corn, soybean and wheat harvested? This factsheet reports new numbers and shows how nutrient removal rates in harvested grain have decreased over the past 25 years.

    More information: go.osu.edu/grain

  4. Author(s):

    This year, due of the wet conditions we experienced during the spring, Fusarium head blight, also known as head scab, developed in a few localized areas of the state. Grain harvested from scab-affected fields is often contaminated with vomitoxin and other mycotoxins, because the disease and toxins go hand in hand. Severely affected kernels are usually small, shriveled, lightweight, covered with pinkish-white fungal mycelium, and most importantly, heavily contaminated with mycotoxins.

  5. The Western Agricultural Research Station Agronomy Field Day will be held July 17th. Hear our researchers thoughts and recommendations on how to manage this interesting season. We will have the field day - rain or shine.

    Held at the OSU Western Agricultural Research Station at 7721 South Charleston Pike, South Charleston (https://oardc.osu.edu/facility/western-agricultural-research-station)

  6. Author(s):

    Corn development varies tremendously across Ohio because of planting dates that range from late April to early July. Some corn is tasseling and silking but in many counties, corn stages range from V7-V12. Moreover, it is not unusual to see striking differences in plant height and growth within cornfields.

    It is important to understand corn growth and development in order to determine the health and status of the crop for effective use of management practices (e.g. application of post-emergence chemicals) and assessment of stress events (e.g. flooding, drought, hail, etc.).

  7. Decisions, decisions these days.  When it comes to selecting the right cover crop for your farm, there is no one-size-fits-all option. This document is to help those of you new to cover crops with the thoughts, questions, and decisions, one needs to make when selecting cover crops.  Planting cover crops on prevent planting acres protects the soil from further water and wind erosion.

  8. The 2019 Ohio Manure Science Review is scheduled for Wednesday, August 7 at JIMITA Holsteins, a 400-plus-acre family dairy farm at 9877 Strasburg Bolivar Road NW in Strasburg Ohio. Strasburg is about 20 miles south of Canton, Tuscarawas County, in Northeast Ohio.

    Registration is $25 by July 30; $30 after July 30; and includes coffee, doughnuts, and lunch and the afternoon tour. Participants can earn Certified Livestock Manager and Certified Crop Advisor credits.

  9. Author(s):

    Waterhemp and Palmer amaranth are both now listed on the Ohio noxious weed law, which means that landowners must take steps to control infestations and prevent further spread.  Since these are annual weeds, preventing spread is achieved by preventing plants from reaching maturity and producing seed.  This is the basis for our “No pigweed left behind” effort, for which the goal is to create an understanding that the only way to beat these weeds is to prevent seed.  Prevention needs to occur in any area that might be subject to infestation, such as roadsides, parks, conservation seedings, par

  10. Week three of The Ohio State University Western bean cutworm (WBC) monitoring network has resulted in an increase of moths captured. Last week’s trap count included WBC adults captured from July 8 – July 13. A total of 24 counties monitored 75 traps across Ohio. Overall, trap counts increased, resulting in a total of 287 WBC adults (18 total last week) and a statewide average of 3.8 moths/trap (up from 0.3 average last week) (Figure 1).

  11. Author(s):

    The Ohio Department of Agriculture Working Lands Buffer Program allows for forage to be grown and harvested from field edge buffers in the Western Lake Erie Basin. Join OSU Extension, Ohio Forage and Grassland Council, and your local Soil and Water Conservations Districts to learn about the Working Lands Program.

    Topics to be covered at these field days include: Soil Fertility ~ Seed Bed Preparation ~ Forage Species Selection ~ Seeding Methods ~ and More!

    Field Days will be held at various locations throughout the Western Basin watershed.