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August 20 - 26
Editor(s): Jeff Stachler
  1. Frogeye leaf spot
    Author(s):

    Several reports over the last two weeks of heavy frogeye leaf spot pressure in some fields as well as low to moderate pressure in others.  This disease will continue to increase and infect new foliage as it develops on these late planted soybeans. Based on our previous research, only once (2018) in 14 years of studies did applications at the soybean growth stage R5 contribute to preserved yield.  At the R5, the leaf at the terminal is fully developed and the pods at any one of the top four nodes is fully expanded, but the seeds are just beginning to expand.

  2. Corn earworm

    There have been recent reports of high corn earworm populations in certain grain corn fields.  Corn earworm is a pest with many hosts including corn, tomatoes and certain legumes.  In Ohio it is typically considered a pest of sweet corn rather than field corn, but this past week substantial populations have been found in certain field corn sites.

  3. Author(s):

    Lately I have received questions as to whether corn at various stages of development, especially the blister (R2) and dough stage (R3) stages, will mature before the 50% average frost date. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, as of August 18, 37 percent of Ohio’s corn acreage was in the dough stage (R4) compared to 70 percent for the five year average, and three percent of the corn acreage was in the dent stage (R5) compared to 21 percent for the five-year average. Many areas of the state corn are considerably behind the five-year average because of late planting.

  4. Night time temperatures can affect corn yield potential. High night temperatures (in the 70s or 80s degrees F) can result in wasteful respiration and a lower net amount of dry matter accumulation in plants. Past studies reveal that above-average night temperatures during grainfill can reduce corn yield by reducing kernel number and kernel weight. The rate of respiration of plants increases rapidly as the temperature increases, approximately doubling for each 13 degree F increase.

  5. Sorghum-sudangrass and Teff
    Author(s):

    Many producers in Ohio have planted summer annual grasses this year to increase their low forage inventories. These include sudangrass, sorghum-sudangrass, forage sorghum, pearl millet, and teff grass. When should these grasses be harvested or grazed?

    The general guidelines for harvesting or grazing these summer annual grasses as listed in the Ohio Agronomy Guide are shown in the table below.

    Table 7-12: Harvest Information for Summer-Annual Grasses.

  6. Author(s):

    For decades, consumer demand for organic food has grown annually by double-digits. (1) While still a comparatively small portion of overall agricultural production, organic corn acreage in the U.S. increased by more than 55% between 2011 and 2016, driven mainly by demand from organic dairy farms.

  7. Author(s):

    Join us for a hands on workshop on Cover Crops and Soil Health September 5 from 5-8pm. Speakers include Dave Brandt, no-tiller and cover cropper for over 40 years. Nathan and Carrie Brause, Crawford County farmers, have no-tilled and cover cropped for the last 6 years. They have also implemented over 50 acres of conservation practices including water ways, filter strips and quail buffers. Frank Gibbs, owner of Wetland and Soil Consulting Services and former NRCS Soil Scientist will talk about soil structure and health.