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August 11 - August 17, 2020
Editor(s): Jeff Stachler
  1. Author(s):

    The authors of the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, and Alfalfa include Steve Culman, Anthony Fulford, James Camberato, Kurt Steinke, Laura Lindsey, Greg LaBarge, Harold Watters, Ed Lentz, Ryan Haden, Eric Richer, Bethany Herman, Nicole Hoekstra, Peter Thomison, Rich Minyo, Anne Dorrance, Jeff Rutan, Darryl Warncke, Cassandra Brown

  2. Flowering Waterhemp
    Author(s):

    In our windshield scouting of soybeans this year we have seen a lot of weedfree fields.  This makes sense given the shift toward Xtend, LibertyLink, LLGT27, and Enlist soybeans over the past several years, which provides us with effective POST options for our major weed problems – common and giant ragweed, marestail, and waterhemp (now if we could just get rid of the baggage some of these traits carry).  We are however getting manyreports of late-season waterhemp as it grows through the soybeans and becomes evident.  This also makes sense given that statewide we are in the midst of an overa

  3. Loading Chicken Litter
    Author(s):

    Stockpiles of poultry litter can be seen in farm fields across Ohio. While common each year in wheat stubble fields, there also many stockpiles in soybean fields. Poultry litter is an excellent source of plant nutrients and readily available in most parts of the state.

  4. Western Bean Cutworm moth

    Western bean cutworm (WBC) trap counts for the week of August 3 – August 9 continue to decrease in the majority of monitoring counties. Trap counts indicated only one county, Lake, had an average of 7 or more moths, suggesting scouting is necessary. Overall, a total of 26 counties monitored 89 traps, resulting in 111 WBC adults (a statewide average of 1.2 moths per trap) (Figure 1). Monitoring for WBC moths will continue in many counties until the end of August.