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March 19-April 1
Editor(s): Eric Richer, CCA
  1. Author(s):

    Lots of news about Soybean cyst nematode at Commodity Classic a couple of weeks ago.

  2. Author(s):

    Co-author: Felipe F. Sartori, Ohio State Department of Plant Pathology

    Lots of calls and samples concerning seed quality (Figure 1) and I’ve also heard about the rejections at the elevators.  I was in Florida a couple of weeks ago with my colleagues (soybean pathologists) from across the country and Ontario, Canada and we are not alone.  We were not the only state whose soybeans had plentiful rains through and after grain fill with some still in the field!

  3. As we continue to search for profitable ways to expand the manure application window in Ohio, we have begun to research dragline application of manure to growing soybeans. While this would potentially open up more time for manure application in the spring, our initial research goal is to look at the ability to apply manure to emerged double crop soybeans after wheat. For many years, livestock producers have successfully applied liquid manure to newly planted soybeans in July to help provide moisture for germination and emergence.

  4. Author(s):

    There have been a few phone calls from farmers calling about needing to get their fertilizer license in order to receive or spread poultry litter. This has been the law in Ohio for several years since Senate Bill 1 was passed. Any farmer handling, receiving, or applying poultry litter (or any other manure) from a permitted farm in Ohio must have either a fertilizer license or a Certified Livestock Manager certificate or be a Certified Crop Advisor. Most poultry farms in Ohio are permitted so nearly all the poultry litter available to farmers is from permitted farms.

  5. Have you gotten your Fertilizer Applicator Certification, yet?  Do you apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres of crops that you sell?  Do you side-dress your corn and farm more than 50 acres?  Yes, that last point could be the “tipper”!  Even if you farm only 50 acres and usually split that across two or three crops, what about the year – for whatever reason – that you plant all corn??  Yep, when it’s time to side-dress that corn, you’re “got”!!

  6. Author(s):

    Do you apply fertilizer (other than manure) to more than 50 acres of land on crops grown primarily for sale?  If so, the Ohio Department of Agriculture requires that you complete a three-hour fertilizer certification training.  Even if you apply fertilizer to less than 50 acres and/or feed all of your crops to livestock, you are encouraged to become certified.  The Tuscarawas County office of Ohio State University Extension will conduct a fertilizer certification class for anyone who is not certified.  This is NOT for recertification.  The training will be held April 9 at 7 pm at the Commun