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June 12 - June 18, 2018
Editor(s): Sarah Noggle
  1. Author(s):

    Small grain harvest will soon be underway. For profitable double crop soybean production, there must be adequate time for the production of the soybean crop and soil moisture. Double crop soybean management differs from traditional, full-season soybean management.

  2. Weather Map Week of June 10
    Author(s):

    Not much has change since last week in terms of the outlook. The rest of June is likely to be warmer than normal with high variability of rainfall but tendency to above normal rainfall.

    It appears a heat dome will be centered in the south central U.S. this summer with periods where it shifts over the corn and soybean belt and Ohio Valley. The next surge of heat will come this weekend into early next week. With these surges come a ring of fire of storms around the heat dome leading to locally heavy rainfall. However, that rain will be scattered in nature.

  3. Head Scab
    Author(s):

    Cool weather and moisture after flowering often means extended grain-fill and high yields, especially when disease levels are as low as they were at the time of pollination and early grain development in some fields. However, excessive rainfall associated with the cool temperatures could increase the severity of diseases that thrive under cool conditions. But with the crop now well into grain-fill and even turning in some locations, there is very little you can do about late-season diseases.

  4. Western Ohio Precision Ag Field Day is planned for July 16, 2018 beginning at 8 a.m. at 9060 Versailles, Southeastern Road, Versailles.

    This event will feature field demonstrations on nutrient placement, management, and utilizing field data to make decisions. Credits will be available for fertilizer applicator re-certification, certified crop consultants, and certified livestock managers.

  5. It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted – for the first and only time.  Ohio’s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).  The first step is assessing overall stand health – do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?  Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate to maximize yield.