Corn
Soybean
Wheat
Forages
Water Quality

Home

July 7 - July 13
  1. Several calls this past week for fungicide applications on corn and soybean at all different growth stages.  So let’s review what might be at stake here.

  2. When soybean prices are low, inputs need to be carefully considered. Will I get a return on my investment?

  3. We are now in the second week of monitoring for Western bean cutworm (WBC) in Ohio. Similar to last week, WBC adult numbers remain low in all monitoring counties. Trap counts for the week of June 29 – July 5 resulted in a total of 56 WBC adults (0.67 average moths per trap) (Figure 1). Overall, 26 counties monitored 84 traps across Ohio. No counties reported capturing more than 1 moth / day over the 7-day monitoring period; therefore, all counties currently remain below the recommended levels that indicate scouting for egg masses should begin. 

  4. Figure 1: U.S. Drought Monitor for Ohio as reported on July 2, 2020.
    Author(s):

    Hot and dry conditions have certainly set in across the Buckeye State. Temperatures this past week have averaged 2-8°F above average, with most locations stringing together at least five consecutive days above 90°F and more to come. Based on the forecast, Columbus will likely reach 11 days this Friday, the longest stretch of 90-degree weather since July 21-31, 1999!

  5. Author(s):

    A few weed-related observations while we try to stay cool and hope for a day of rain or at least popup thunderstorms.

  6. Potassium deficiency symptoms of corn and soybean include yellowing/browning of lower (older) leaves with edges exhibiting symptoms first. Potassium deficiency symptoms can indicate low soil test potassium (K), but may also be related to recent dry soils, compaction, and poor root growth.

  7. Author(s):

    First and second cutting hay yields are being reported as lower than usual in many areas of Ohio this year. Forages took a hit from the late freezes and cold weather this spring, followed by dry weather after first cutting. Fortunately, hay quality is much better than usual.

  8. Author(s):

    Wheat harvest will soon be wrapped up in Ohio and some farmers will plant double-crop soybeans. The summer manure application window following wheat harvest is typically the 2nd largest application window each year. In recent years there has been more interest from livestock producers in applying manure to newly planted soybeans to provide moisture to help get the crop to emerge.

  9. In recent days we have been experiencing 90 degree F days with limited precipitation, and so we are starting to see some leaf rolling in corn. Some of this may be related to reductions in soil moisture, but may be related to restricted root systems as well. Depending on the stage of corn at the time of these conditions, different effects on yield may be expected. Corn ear development occurs throughout the growing season, and extreme temperature or moisture stress at different growth stages will decrease different aspects of grain yield.