Corn Newsletter : 2020-07

  1. Author(s): Sam Custer

    Did your conference get canceled? Looking to fill the void of the big basketball tournament? OSU Extension Agricultural and Natural Resources Educators are here to assist.

    Agriculture and Natural Resources Madness: A Tournament of Education consists of 64 educational events broken into daily brackets. Each day, a virtual educational session will be held at 9:00 a.m., noon and 3:00 p.m. at no charge. All events are listed at https://go.osu.edu/agmadness.

  2. Author(s): Jim Noel

    Temperatures and Rainfall: Temperatures will start the first 7 days of April 1-3 degrees F above normal. Rainfall will start April below normal about half of normal. That is some good news  as the end of March (as forecast) was very wet. However, most indications are for the remainder of April after the first week, temperatures will be near normal and rainfall slightly above normal. This will put pressure on early spring planting in April. Evaporation and evapotransporation will be held in check by closer to normal temperatures as we go through April.

  3. Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    Due to the COVID-19 and expected resulting budget issues, the Ohio Department of Agriculture has reinstated the original Tuesday, March 31st deadline for H2Ohio sign-up. The original deadline had been tentatively extended to June 2nd because of the COVID-19 but this extension no longer exists.

  4. Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA, Laura Lindsey, Steve Culman

    Wheat has already reached green-up across the state so spring N may be applied anytime fields are fit. Keep in mind that research has shown N can be applied up to Feekes GS 6 (one visible node) without a reduction in yield. However, wheat is growing slowly because of the cool temperatures, particularly in northern Ohio. Nitrogen applied early has the potential to be lost since wheat will use little N prior to jointing (Feekes GS 6). Urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) or 28% has the greatest potential for loss and ammonium sulfate the least.

  5. Author(s): Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Mark Sulc

    Looking at both the calendar and weather forecasts, frost-seeding is no longer a viable option to add red clover into a wheat stand. We can’t count on good freeze/thaw cycles to create those honeycomb conditions in the soil that create good seed to soil contact.  The option left is to broadcast clover seed over the wheat stand.  Successful establishment still depends upon getting good seed/soil contact.  Growers need to evaluate soil, weather and stand conditions to determine if a straight broadcast operation is worth their time, effort and expense. 

  6. Author(s): Mark Loux, Curtis Young, CCA

    Poison hemlock remains one of the more persistent and prevalent poisonous weeds that we deal with in Ohio.  It's most typically a biennial plant (sometimes perennial), emerging from seed in year one and developing into a low-growing rosette by late fall.  The rosette overwinters and then resumes growth in the spring of year two.  Stem elongation initiates sooner in spring than many other biennials, and this is followed by continued growth and development into the often very tall plant with substantial overall size.  Flowering and seed production occur in summer. 

  7. Author(s): Curtis Young, CCA

    Cutworms are the larval stage of several moths in the insect Order Lepidoptera: Family Noctuidae (the Owlet Moths) which includes cutworms and armyworms.

  8. Author(s): Amanda Douridas

    Toxicity of pesticides is important for farmers to understand because it can affect your health and safety. It also helps when addressing questions that come from consumers about why you use pesticides and how toxicity compares to products they use every day. When considering the toxicity of pesticides, we need to address the toxicity to both pests and humans. But first, please note the term pesticide refers any chemical used to manage pests (insecticide, herbicide, fungicide, etc), and a pest refers to what is being controlled (insect, weed, disease, etc).

  9. Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    Many local Extension office have received farmer calls lately asking how the COVID-19 emergency will affect pesticide recertification. The "Stay at home" order began prior to the end of March 2020, leaving those remaining private pesticide and fertilizer training programs postponed or suspended for the moment. On a normal year, the 3-year private applicator re-certification cycle ends on March 31.

  10. Author(s): Sarah Noggle

    After taking a break from surveying in the last two years, the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) is now once again sending out a national cover crop survey to farmers.  The survey questions are primarily geared toward grain farmers. Still, there are some questions specific to horticulture producers and a fair number of items that any type of crop producer would find relevant.  Most survey questions are for farmers already using cover crops, but there are a few for farmers not yet using cover crops.  

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

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