Corn Newsletter : 2014-36

  1. Author(s): Peter Thomison, Allen Geyer, Rich Minyo

    According to the USDA/NASS ( http://www.nass.usda.gov/ ) as of Sunday, Oct. 19, 23% of Ohio’s corn was mature, compared to 30% for last year and 32% for the five-year average.  Persistent rains have delayed corn harvest across the state and are not helping with field drying.  Many growers are delaying harvest until grain moisture drops further.  However, leaving corn to dry in the field exposes a crop to unfavorable weather conditions, as well as wildlife damage.

  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    It is already the third week of October and most of the corn is still standing in the field.  Some of the earlier-planted fields are being harvested, but at relatively high moisture levels.  This is causing some concern among producers as to the potential for ear rot and mycotoxin problems.  In fact, we have already received several samples of moldy ears from some fields, but so far the problem does not seem to be widespread, with only a few fields affected.  Moreover, not every ear rot is associated with vomitoxin or other mycotoxin contamination of the grain.

  3. Author(s): Mark Loux

    The USEPA last week issued approval for Enlist Duo, the glyphosate-2,4-D premix for use in the Enlist corn and soybean system, in six states, including Ohio.  The approval came with a number of conditions that set a new precedent really, and we will cover these in more detail later this fall.  Dow informed us that they would provide more information in the near future about intentions for the scope of the 2015 launch of Enlist.  They are still working on export clearances for some countries and as with most new things, availability will be limited initially anyway.  We obviously have proble

  4. Seedcorn maggot damage that reduced soybean stand
    Author(s): Andy Michel

    Last week, the EPA determined that there is no benefit from neonicotinoid seed treatments on soybean.  There complete ruling can be read here (http://www2.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2014-10/documents/benefits_of_neonicotinoid_seed_treatments_to_soybean_production_2.pdf ), and is based on an analysis of data published comparing treated and non-treated soybean.  They conclude that “Published data indicate that in most cases there is no difference

  5. Author(s): Harold D. Watters, CPAg/CCA

    With late crop development this year, we still have a lot of crops to check.  One excellent tool is the Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide - updated and in a new format this year - will help with this chore.  The Field Guide is available for sale on OSU Extension’s eStore, or may be ordered from any county Extension office as well.

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio Crop Producers and Industry. C.O.R.N. is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, State Specialists at The Ohio State University and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. C.O.R.N. Questions are directed to State Specialists, Extension Associates, and Agents associated with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center at The Ohio State University.