Corn Newsletter : 2014-40

  1. Author(s): Peter Thomison, Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer, David Lohnes

    In 2014, 209 corn hybrids representing 28 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide).  Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.  

  2. Author(s): John Fulton

    The end of harvest marks a good time to implement good management practices for yield monitors including taking steps to winterize components.  Yield monitors continue to increase and in most cases are standard options on today’s combines with the yield mapping data being important information for precision agriculture services offered across the agriculture industry.  A good post-harvest combine maintenance plan should include provisions for looking over yield monitor components and possibly storing devices in conditioned locations to reduce warming and cooling cycles potentially generatin

  3. Author(s): Laura Lindsey, JD Bethel

    The purpose of the Ohio Soybean Seed Treatment and Foliar Trials are to evaluate soybean seed treatments and foliar products for stand and yield.  This evaluation gives soybean producers comparative information for selecting soybean seed treatments and foliar products for the unique production systems.  All entries were submitted voluntarily by companies.  Application protocol and product rate were provided by the company.  Please keep in mind that our trials are conducted in overall high-yielding environments with well-drained soil and limited pest pressure.

  4. Author(s): John Fulton

    As the harvest season comes to a close, now is a good time to clean and look over you combine before parking for the winter.  A good post-harvest combine maintenance program can provide significant savings and make sure you are prepared for 2015. Many times, proper inspection and maintenance after fall harvest will reduce time and resources required at a later date to fix the combine and headers.

  5. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey, Peter Thomison, Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer

    Drought events are predicted to increase with rising global temperatures and altered rainfall patterns. It is important that agronomists investigate ways to maximize water use to help reduce grain yield losses from drought events. If Ohio corn yields had been reduced 10% in 2013 due to drought, then the economic loss for growers would have exceeded $250 million. Ohio producers have begun using drought-tolerant corn hybrids that were developed for use in the Western Corn Belt to manage for drought events, but limited research has been conducted on these hybrids in the Eastern Corn Belt.

  6. Author(s): Debbie Brown, CCA

    West Ohio Agronomy Day will be held on Monday, January 12th at St. Michael’s Hall, 33 Elm Street, Fort Loramie.  Registration will begin at 8:00 a.m.; breakfast sandwiches, donuts, orange juice, and coffee will be available.  A Grain Market update from Jerry Meyer (Cargill) and John Leighty (Trupointe) will be held at 8:30 a.m.  The programs dealing with Private Pesticide Applicator Recertification Credits for farmers, Continuing Education Units for Certified Crop Advisors, and Fertilizer Certification Training for those with Pesticide Applicator Licenses then begin at 9:00 a.m. 

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio Crop Producers and Industry. C.O.R.N. is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, State Specialists at The Ohio State University and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. C.O.R.N. Questions are directed to State Specialists, Extension Associates, and Agents associated with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center at The Ohio State University.