Brown Pods, Green Stems

Last week, we received a few comments about soybeans having mature pods, but the stems remaining green. Similar observations were made in 2012…another dry year. Green stems on soybean may be a result of a source/sink problem. With the hot and dry conditions this year, pod set was likely reduced. With a limited number of pods (sink), there are fewer places for the plant’s photosynthates (source) to go.

From previously conducted work by Dr. Jim Beuerlein, when soybean pods were removed from a plant node when they first formed and started to expand, the leaf at that node stayed green after the rest of the plant matured. If all the small pods were removed from a branch on a plant, that branch did not mature. Further, if setting of pods were prevented on the main stem of a plant but pods allowed to develop normally on the branches, those branches matured normally while the main stem stayed green and held onto its leaves. Anatomical studies of the flow of carbohydrates within a plant show that each leaf fills the pods at its node only, but if all its carbohydrates are not needed at that node, the extra will move to the next lower node. Therefore, soybean plants digest their leaves, petioles and stems to complete the pod filling process and add a few more bushels per acre. If the digestion of plant parts is not needed to complete pod fill, then these plant parts remain green.

Another possible cause of stay green syndrome might be stink bug feeding. As the bugs feed, they inject saliva which may impact the plant’s physiology to remain green. In 2012, some acres of green stem were known to have stink bug infestations, especially along the edge. We have seen similar fields with stink bug pressure in 2016. To check for stink bug feeding, open a few pods and look for shriveled or flat seeds (see Figure for stink bug damaged seed) that may indicate stink bug feeding.

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.