Corn Newsletter : 2017-30

  1. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service (http://www.nass.usda.gov/) as of Sept. 10, 69 percent of Ohio’s corn acreage was in the dent stage (R5) compared to 76 percent for the five-year average; 16 percent of the corn acreage was mature, slightly less than the five-year average, 18 percent. In some areas of the state, corn is considerably behind the five-year average because of late planting (the result of

  2. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    The recent cooler than normal temperatures may impact corn drydown. Once corn achieves physiological maturity (when kernels have obtained maximum dry weight and black layer has formed), it will normally dry approximately 3/4 to 1% per day during favorable drying weather (sunny and breezy) during the early warmer part of the harvest season from mid‑September through late September. By early to mid‑October, dry-down rates will usually drop to ½ to 3/4% per day. By late

  3. Author(s): Alan Sundermeier, CCA

    As soybeans are maturing around Ohio, an opportunity to establish an early cover crop is available.   If a farmer waits until after soybean harvest, then many days of growth are being wasted.

    Soybeans should have dropped 10% of their leaves before seeding a cover crop.  Planting too early and the cover crop may have too much growth and interfere with combine operation and green material separation.  Waiting too late will place the seed on top of

  4. Author(s): Laura Lindsey, Pierce Paul, Ed Lentz, CCA, Eric Richer, CCA

    Growers are interested in wide-row wheat production due to changes in equipment inventory (lack of grain drill and availability of air seeder) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. Wheat row

  5. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    With corn now beyond the R4 growth state in most fields, there is really nothing you can do about southern rust in terms of fungicide application. However, correct diagnosis of this disease is still very important from the standpoint of identifying the hybrids that were most severely affected. Although our growing conditions generally do not favor this disease and we may go for another several years without seeing as much southern rust as we did in 2017, we still need to

  6. Author(s): Harold D. Watters, CPAg/CCA

    The Farm Science Review will be held again this year at the London, Ohio location. Dates are September 19, 20 and 21. See http://fsr.osu.edu for more information. Harvest has not quite stared yet so you should have the time to check in.

    The Agronomic Crops Team (http://agcrops.osu.edu) will once again be welcoming visitors on the east side of the grounds between the

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio Crop Producers and Industry. C.O.R.N. is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, State Specialists at The Ohio State University and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. C.O.R.N. Questions are directed to State Specialists, Extension Associates, and Agents associated with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center at The Ohio State University.