Corn Newsletter : 2018-40

  1. 2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test: Regional Overviews

    Corn Trial

    In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide).  Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.

    Growing conditions were very favorable for corn production across most of Ohio in 2018. The growing season was characterized by well above average rainfall and heat unit accumulation (growing degree-days). Precipitation and heat unit accumulation were generally greater at OCPT sites  in the SW/WC/C region (with rainfall ranging from 23.3 to 26.3 inches and heat unit accumulation ranging from 3270 to 3520 GDDs) than at sites in the NW and NC/NE regions. Moreover, rainfall was generally well distributed at these sites. The impact of dry conditions in July and August on crop performance at the Van Wert and Hoytville sites in NW Ohio and the Wooster and Beloit sites in NE/NC Ohio were mitigated by timely rains in late August and September. Due to the warm, wet conditions, foliar diseases (primarily gray leaf spot) and ear rots (primarily Gibberella and Diplodia ear rots) were present at nearly all test sites. However, the disease severity was highly variable and it was usually most pronounced for a limited number of hybrids. The highest yielding sites were generally associated with foliar fungicide applications at tassel – the major exception being the test site at Bucyrus (the second highest yielding OCPT site in 2018) which exhibited little leaf disease or ear rot. Stalk lodging was evident mostly in the NW and NE/NC test sites but negligible for most of the hybrids evaluated. Warm temperatures in August through mid-October promoted crop maturation and dry down but persistent rains in September through November slowed harvest.

    In 2018, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service estimates Ohio’s corn yield at 193 bu/A, which would be 16 bu/A more than last year’s and highest on record if realized. Yields at OCPT test sites paralleled the record yields reported across the state this year. Averaged across hybrid entries in the early and full season tests, yields were 273 bu/A in the Southwestern/West Central/Central region, 238 bu/A in the Northwestern region, and 242 bu/A in the North Central/Northeastern region.  Yields at individual test sites, averaged across hybrid entries in the early and full season tests, ranged from 203 bu/A at Beloit to 285 bu/A at Greenville. Performance data for Upper Sandusky in the NW region is not presented because excessive rainfall shortly after planting created variable field conditions that resulted in erratic stands, uneven growth and inconsistent yields. 

    Tables 1 and 2 provide an overview of 2018 hybrid performance in the early maturity and full season hybrid trials by region. Averages for grain yield and other measures of agronomic performance are indicated for each region. In addition, the range in regional test site averages is shown in parentheses. Complete results are available online at: http://oardc.osu.edu/corntrials/. A bulletin containing the results, 2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test,is also published as an insert in Ohio’s Country Journal.

    As you review 2018 test results, it’s important to keep the following in mind. Confidence in test results increases with the number of years and the number of locations in which the hybrid was tested. Avoid selecting a hybrid based on data from a single test site, especially if the site was characterized by abnormal growing conditions. Look for consistency in a hybrid's performance across a range of environmental conditions. Consider the table providing a “Combined regional summary of hybrid performance” which indicates the performance of hybrids common to nine statewide test sites and the six tests in western Ohio.  Differences in grain moisture percentages among hybrids at harvest can provide a basis for comparing hybrid maturity. Yield, % stalk lodging, grain moisture, and other comparisons should be made between hybrids of similar maturity to determine those best adapted to your farm. 

     

    Table 1.   A regional overview of the early maturity 2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test.

     

    Region

     

    Entries

    Grain Yield

    (Bu/A)

    Moisture

    (%)

    Lodging

    (%)

    Emergence

    (%)

    Final Stand

    (plants/A)

    Test Wt.

    (lbs/bu)

    SW/WC/C

    69

     

    269

    (218-302)

    16.9

    (15.5-18.3)

    2

    (0-17)

    96

    (92-99)

    33400

    (27000-37100)

    57.6

    (54.2-59.8)

    NW

    59

     

    235

    (215-249)

    17.0

    (15.7-17.8)

    3

    (0-11)

    94

    (86-99)

    32800

    (25700-36800)

    58.1

    (55.6-60.7)

    NE/NC

    58

     

    238

    (218-256)

    18.6

    (17.5-19.9)

    1

    (0-7)

    96

    (86-99)

    33100

    (27100-37400)

    57.2

    (54.7-59.2)

     

    Table 2.  A regional overview of the full season 2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test.

     

    Region

     

    Entries

    Grain Yield

    (Bu/A)

    Moisture

    (%)

    Lodging

    (%)

    Emergence

    (%)

    Final Stand

    (plants/A)

    Test Wt.

    (lbs/bu)

    SW/WC/C

    60

    277

    (254-294)

    18.3

    (16.3-21.0)

    2

    (0-9)

    97

    (89-99)

    33900

    (27100-37200)

    57.7

    (55.2-60.0)

    NW

    78

     

    241

    (220-256)

    18.0

    (16.7-19.5)

    6

    (0-38)

    96

    (89-98)

    33400

    (29800-35700)

    58.0

    (55.7-60.2)

    NE/NC

    62

    245

    (226-261)

    20.2

    (18.3-22.5)

    2

    (0-20)

    97

    (90-99)

    33900

    (27000-37200)

    56.5

    (53.7-58.7)

     

  2. Register Now! Precision U: In-Season Decisions

    Precision University Logo

    Digital agriculture, combining multiple data sources with advanced crop and environmental analyses to provide support for on-farm decision making, continues to change and advance our industry. Data and digital technologies can provide insights and opportunities to improve crop management by responding to each season’s unique conditions. Next month, The Ohio State University Extension and the Digital Ag team at OSU are hosting “Precision University: In-Season Decisions” to help you understand the opportunities and challenges of using data and tools to help make crop management decisions throughout the season.

    The program will be held on January 9that Beck’s Hybrid’s, 720 U.S. 40 in London, Ohio. University and industry experts will share information on the latest tools and technologies to help you make better decisions during the growing season. The event will also feature afternoon breakout sessions on using aerial imagery for decision making and the latest advancements in sprayer nozzle technology.

    Presentations at Precision University begin at 8:30 a.m. with the program concluding at 3:30 p.m. The event will also feature vendors on site to share the tools and services they offer. CCA CEUs will be offered.

    The cost to register for Precision University is $50 and includes the program, handouts, lunch and refreshments. For more information or to register, visit http://go.osu.edu/PrecisionU. The deadline to register is January 2.

     

    Speakers for the 2019 Precision U include:

    Dr. Ignacio Ciampitti, Kansas State University
    Dr. Greg Kruger, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Dr. Joe Luck, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Dr. Anne Dorrance, The Ohio State University
    Jim Degrand, The Ohio State University
    Dr. Matt Darr, Iowa State University
          

    SCOUTING Session

    Andrew Bond, Encirca

    Brian Sutton, Airscout

    Jim Love, Beck’s Hybrids


    EQUIPMENT & TECH Session

    Michael Lairson, Raven Technology

    Justin Moffit, John Deere

    Tim Grigsby, Capstan Ag

  3. Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium

    Author(s): John Barker

    The Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium will be held on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at All Occasions Catering, 6986 Waldo-Delaware Road, Waldo, Ohio from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This year’s program will feature the most current technologies available in precision agriculture. These topics will be shared by some of the leading university and industry Precision Ag experts.

    This year’s program opens with a discussion regarding where we are in Precision Ag today – “The Adoption of Precision Ag Technologies” - Jack Zemlicka, Ag Division Content Director Lessiter Media and ends with a look into the crystal ball – “The Future of Precision Ag” – Dr. Scott Shearer, The Ohio State University.

    Data management is a “hot topic” in today precision agriculture.  Dr. John Fulton will share his insights on “Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production.”  You will learn about data security and who can/has access to your data at afternoon breakout sessions from Climate-Fieldview, Agleader–Agfinity, and My JohnDeere.  Learn about the value of your data and opportunities for selling your data at one of the Farm Mobile breakout sessions.

    Artificial intelligence is changing our industry. Tim Norris will discuss “AI” and share insights from Knox County’s first autonomous tractor.  “AI” will be part of several other afternoon breakout sessions as well. New datum changes are scheduled for 2022.  Jeff Jalbrzikowski will explain how this change could potentially affect our current maps and GPS positioning files.

    To be the premier source of research-based information in the age of digital agriculture” is the vision of the Ohio State Digital Ag Program. Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins will discuss the nearly 100 OSU on-farm research trials conducted throughout Ohio in 2018. Everyone in attendance will receive a copy of the 2018 eFields Report.

    Afternoon breakout sessions will include manufacturing and technology updates including how to get the most from your in-cab displays from John Deere, Case IH AFS, Precision Planting, Capstan, AGCO, New Holland and Soil Max.  

    $50 registration fee includes a buffet lunch, breaks and a notebook containing all presentations. Seating is limited, and the registration deadline is December 28, 2018.  

    This symposium will provide up to 11.5 Continuing Education Credits (CEU’s) for Certified Crop Advisers: 

                                                    S&W - .5, I.P.M. - 5.5, C.M. - 5.5.           

    This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank, JD Equipment, Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

     

    For more information or to download registration form, go to http://u.osu.edu/knoxcountyag/2018/11/28/central-ohio-pre…ion-ag-symposium/or

    https://knox.osu.edu/news/central-ohio-precision-ag-symposium or contact the OSU Extension Office in Knox County at 740-397-0401 or AgInfoTech 740-507-2503. 

    Click here for a flyer. 

About the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

Contributors

Andy Michel (State Specialist, Entomology)
Bruce Clevenger, CCA (Defiance County)
Dean Kreager (Licking County)
Debbie Brown, CCA (Shelby County)
Elizabeth Hawkins (Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems)
Eric Richer, CCA (Fulton County)
Garth Ruff (Henry County)
Glen Arnold, CCA (Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management )
Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA (Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems)
James Morris (Brown County)
Jason Hartschuh, CCA (Crawford County)
Jeff Stachler (Auglaize County)
Les Ober, CCA (Geauga County)
Peter Thomison (State Specialist, Corn Production)
Rory Lewandowski, CCA (Wayne County)
Sam Custer (Darke County)
Sarah Noggle (Paulding County)

Disclaimer

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.