C.O.R.N. Newsletter: 2020-31

  1. Labor Day Rainfall Eases Drought

    Figure 1: U.S. Drought Monitor for Ohio as reported on Thursday September 10, 2020.
    Author(s): Aaron Wilson

    Weather Summary

    Summer (June – August) 2020 ranks as the 11th warmest and 29th driest summer on record for the state of Ohio since 1895. Temperatures averaged 1-4°F above average (1981-2010), with 5-10 inches of rainfall across the northwestern half of the state and 10-15 inches across the southeastern half. Particularly dry this summer has been the northwestern counties, a few counties in central and southwest Ohio (e.g., Madison, Pickaway, Ross, Fayette, and Greene), as well as Richland, Ashland, Wayne, and Stark Counties. 

    Though too late for most crops in the state, recent rainfall is helping to recharge soil moisture. A slow-moving boundary draped across the state on Labor Day brought significant rainfall to much of northern Ohio. Most locations along and north of about I-70 (except NW Ohio) received 2-7” of rain. There was also a confirmed EF0 tornado a few miles east of Delaware with estimated winds to 80 mph and a few reports of large hail across the state. As of Thursday September 10, 2020, the U.S. Drought Monitor indicates about 19% of Ohio is experiencing abnormally dry to moderate drought conditions, down from about 37% the prior week (Figure 1). For more information on recent climate conditions and impacts, check out the latest Hydro-Climate Assessment from the State Climate Office of Ohio

    Day 11 image not availableForecast

     

    Figure 2: Forecast precipitation for the next 7 days. Valid from 8 am Monday September 14, 2020 through 8 am Monday September 21, 2020. Figure from the Weather Prediction Center.

    High pressure and pleasant conditions are on tap for much of the upcoming week. A cold front approaching the region on Thursday could draw up some moisture from what is left of Hurricane Sally; but if it does, it is only expected to impact counties near the Ohio River. High temperatures this week should top out in 60s and 70s across the state, with overnight lows in the 40s and 50s. A reinforcing high pressure system over the weekend will reinforce cool, dry conditions over the weekend. The Weather Prediction Center is currently forecasting less than 0.25” across the southern counties and dry conditions across the north (Figure 2).

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    Figure 3: Climate Prediction Center 8-14 Day Outlook valid for September 22 – 28, 2020 for left) temperatures and right) precipitation. Colors represent the probability of below, normal, or above normal conditions.

    The latest NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center outlook for the 8-14 day period (September 22 - 28) and the 16-Day Rainfall Outlook from NOAA/NWS/Ohio River Forecast Center show elevated probabilities for near average temperatures and below average precipitation (Figure 3). Normal highs during the period are in the low to mid- to upper-70s, lows in the mid- to upper-50s, with about 0.75” of rainfall per week.

  2. It’s time for the Hessian Fly-free Date Again

    Hessian Fly Safe Dates for Ohio counties

    The cold temperatures this week reminded us that we are approaching our fly-free date for Ohio. These
    dates are based on predictions on when most Hessian fly adults would no longer be alive to lay eggs on
    emerging wheat. Planting winter crops after this date is a good practice to prevent infestations. Areas
    of Northern Ohio can safely plant wheat after September 22, whereas the dates in southern Ohio extend
    to October 4 and 5.

    The fly free date can also be used for both cover crops and to manage diseases. Hessian fly can infest
    certain types of cover crops such as rye and triticale. While we may not worry about yield loss in cover
    crops, high populations in the winter may provide for infestations in the following spring. For diseases,
    the biggest advantage and most important benefit of planting after the fly-safe date is reduction in fall
    establishment of Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV), Stagonospora blotch, and Septoria leaf spot.
    Populations of the aphids that transmit BYDV are usually much lower after the fly-safe date, thus
    reducing the level of transmission of the disease to the new crop. BYDV tends to be more damaging and
    causes the greatest yield loss when it becomes established in the fall. For leaf diseases such as
    Stagonospora and Septoria, planting after the fly-safe date also reduces the risk of fall infections. When
    Stagonospora- and Septoria-causing fungi overwinter in the leaves, this usually gives both diseases a
    head-start in the spring, leading to great and earlier damage of the flag leaves before grain-fill is
    complete, and consequently, greater yield loss if a susceptible cultivar is planted and diseases are not
    managed with a fungicide.

  3. Surface Application of Manure to Newly Planted Wheat Fields

    Manure Application to Wheat
    Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    Several livestock producers have inquired about applying liquid dairy or swine manure to newly planted wheat fields using a drag hose. The thought process is that the fields are firm (dry), there is very little rain in the nearby forecast, and the moisture in the manure could help with wheat germination and emergence.

    The manure nutrients could easily replace the commercial fertilizer normally applied in advance of planting wheat. The application of fall-applied livestock manure to newly planted or growing crop can reduce nutrient losses compared to fall-applied manure without a growing crop.

    Both swine and dairy manure can be used to add moisture to newly planted wheat. It’s important that the wheat seeds were properly covered with soil when planted to keep a barrier between the salt and nitrogen in the manure and the germinating wheat seed. It’s also important that livestock producers know their soil phosphorus levels, and the phosphorus in the manure being applied, so we don’t grow soil phosphorus levels beyond what is acceptable.

    If the wheat is planted at its typical one-inch depth and swine or dairy manure is surface applied there should be no problem applying 5,000 gallons per acre of swine manure or 8,000 gallons per acre of dairy manure. If the wheat is emerging when manure is being applied, there is the possibility of some burn to the wheat from swine manure, but this has not happened in fields I have looked at in past years. If the wheat is fully emerged, there is little concern for burning.

    If incorporating manure ahead of planting wheat, try to place the manure deep enough (at least three inches) so the manure does not impact the germination and emergence of the wheat crop. Another option is to incorporate the manure and wait a few days before planting the wheat. If incorporated, the opportunity to carry some of the manure nitrogen through the winter could allow for a reduction in the amount of top-dress nitrogen needed for the wheat crop next spring.

    The application of 5,000 gallons of swine finishing manure could contain 200# of nitrogen, 75 pounds of P2O5 and 125 pounds of K2O. The application of 8,000 gallons of dairy manure could contain 175 pounds of nitrogen, 60 pounds of P2O5 and 150 pounds of K2O. Manure nutrient content can vary tremendously from one manure storage facilitate to another but stay reasonably consistence from the same facility year after year.

    As always, print out the weather forecast when surface applying manure. Remember the “not greater than 50% chance of 0.5 inches of rainfall in the next 24 hours” rule in the western Lake Erie Basin watershed. Also be certain to observe the proper setbacks from ditches and streams.

  4. Ask the Expert Sessions to Be Held Live During 2020 Farm Science Review.

    Author(s): David Marrison

    For the first time in its nearly 60-year history, Ohio State’s Farm Science Review scheduled for September 22 -24 will not be held in-person.  Instead, a virtual show will be held and the Review will come to you on your laptop or smartphone this year, and for free.  You can watch livestreamed talks and recorded videos featuring the latest farm equipment and research to pique your curiosity.

    Virtual visitors can find out about the show’s offerings by going to fsr.osu.edu and clicking on an image of the show’s site. Within that image, people can click on the various icons to find the schedules for talks and demos they’re most interested in, such as field demonstrations or “Ask the Expert” talks. 

    Among the livestreamed talks will be Ask the Expert presentations. Viewers will enter the talks through a Zoom meeting link and be able to post their questions in chat boxes. If you miss any, you can check back after the talks to watch the recordings.

    The 20 minute “Ask the Expert” presentations at Farm Science Review are one segment of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine comprehensive Extension Education efforts during the three days of the Farm Science Review. Our experts will share science-based recommendations and solutions to the issues people are facing regarding weather impacts, tariffs, veterinarian medicine, and low commodity prices.

    Topics for talks at FSR this year include the risks of transmitting COVID-19 to your animals, the prospects of U.S. agricultural exports abroad, increasing profits from small grains by planting double crops, climate trends, managing cash flow on the farm, farm stress, and rental rates on agricultural land.

    To access all prerecorded and livestreamed talks at Farm Science Review, sign up on or after Sept. 8 at fsr.osu.edu.  

    A complete list of the Ask the Expert Session are as follows:

    Tuesday, September 22, 2020

    The Talk on Friday Avenue 
    Value Chains in Food and Agriculture 
    9:30-10:30 a.m.

    Keeping Backyard Poultry Healthy
    Tim McDermott DVM 
    10:40-11:00 a.m.

    Crop Inputs & Margins: Challenges for this Year and Next 
    Barry Ward 
    11:00-11:20 a.m.

    Farm Stress-Finding the Sunshine in the Storm 
    Sarah Noggle
    11:20-11:40 a.m.

    COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself? 
    Scott Kenney 
    11:40-12:00 p.m.

    Weather is Always on my Mind 
    Aaron Wilson
    12:00-12:20 p.m.

    How to Get $4 Corn
    Ben Brown 
    12:20-12:40 p.m.

    Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along? 
    Peggy Hall
    12:40-1:00 p.m.

    Prospects for US Exports: Pandemic vs. the Phase 1 Agreement with China 
    Ian Sheldon 
    1:00-1:20 p.m. 

    Increasing Small Grains Profitability with Double Crops 
    Eric Richer 
    1:20-1:40 p.m.

    Making Sense of the Modeling of Infectious Diseases 
    Rebecca Garabed VMD 
    1:40-2:00 p.m.

    Ohio Cropland Values & Cash Rents: Is Change Coming? 
    Barry Ward 
    2:00-2:20 p.m.

    Farm CFO: Doing More Than a Tax Return 
    Bruce Clevenger 
    2:20-2:40 p.m.

    COVID-19: Impacts on Workers and the Food Supply or Where’s the beef? How COVID-19 is altering animal agriculture
    Gustavo Schuenemann 
    DVM 2:40-3:00 p.m.

    Wednesday, September 23, 2020

    Weather is Always on my Mind 
    Aaron Wilson
    10:00-10:20 a.m.

    Farming through COVID 
    Chris Zoller & Dee Jepsen
    10:20-10:40 a.m.

    Fly Control Issues--Don’t Get Pinkeye! 

    Jeff Lakritz DVM
    10:40-11:00 a.m.

    Working Capital-More money going out than coming in, what do I do? 
    Dianne Shoemaker
    11:00-11:20 a.m.

    Water Quality and Nutrient Management-Canwe make more money and avoid regulation? 
    Greg LaBarge
    11:20-11:40 a.m.

    Farm Stress-Finding the Sunshine in the Storm 
    Sarah Noggle
    11:40-12:00 p.m.

    Crop Inputs & Margins: Challenges for this Year and Next 
    Barry Ward
    12:00-12:20 p.m.

    The Happy ½ Hour on the Economics of Malting Barley in Ohio 
    Mike Estadt
    12:20-12:40 p.m.

    Keeping Backyard Poultry Healthy 
    Tim McDermott DVM
    12:40-1:00 p.m.

    How to Get $4 Corn 
    Ben Brown 
    1:00-1:20 p.m.

    COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself? 
    Scott Kenney
    1:20-1:40 p.m.

    Micro Business Data Management 
    Sid Dasgupta
    1:40-2:00 p.m.

    Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along? 
    Peggy Hall
    2:00-2:20 p.m.

    Economics of Parasite Control and Drug Resistance 
    Antoinette Marsh DVM
    2:20-2:40 p.m.

    Are you ready for the hearse to arrive? 
    David Marrison
    2:40-3:00 p.m.

    Thursday, September 24, 2020

    Keeping Horses Healthy: The old gray mare, she ain't what she used to be 
    Eric Schroeder DVM
    10:00-10:20 a.m.

    Making Sense of the Modeling of Infectious Diseases 
    Rebecca Garabed VMD
    10:20-10:40 a.m.

    Increasing Small Grains Profitability with Double Crops 
    Eric Richer
    10:40-11:00 a.m.

    COVID-19: Impacts on Workers and the Food Supply or Where’s the beef? How COVID-19 is altering animal agriculture
    Gustavo Schuenemann, DVM
    11:00-11:20 a.m.

    Are you ready for the hearse to arrive? 
    David Marrison
    11:20-11:40 a.m.

    Working Capital-More money going out than coming in, what do I do? 
    Dianne Shoemaker
    11:40-12:00 p.m. 

    How to Get $4 Corn 
    Ben Brown 
    12:00-12:20 p.m.

    Ohio Cropland Values & Cash Rents: Is Change Coming? 
    Barry Ward
    12:20-12:40 p.m.

    Weather is Always on my Mind 
    Aaron Wilson
    12:40-1:00 p.m.

    Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along? 
    Peggy Hall 
    1:00-1:20 p.m.

    COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself?
    Scott Kenney
    1:20-1:40 p.m.

    Hay ewe, No hay-No way?
    Alejandro Relling
    1:40-2:00 p.m.

    For more information about the Ask the Expert Sessions, contact David Marrison, OSU Extension Educator at marrison.2@osu.edu

Crop Observation and Recommendation Network

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

Contributors

Aaron Wilson (Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center)
Alan Leininger (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Amanda Bennett (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Amanda Douridas (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Andrew Holden (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Andy Michel (State Specialist, Entomology)
Beth Scheckelhoff (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Boden Fisher (Water Quality Extension Associate)
Bruce Clevenger, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Chris Zoller (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Clint Schroeder (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Curtis Young, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
David Marrison (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Dean Kreager (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Dennis Riethman (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Elizabeth Hawkins (Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems)
Eric Richer, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Gigi Neal (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Glen Arnold, CCA (Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management )
Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA (Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems)
James Morris (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Lee Beers, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Les Ober, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Mark Badertscher (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Mark Loux (State Specialist, Weed Science)
Mark Sulc (State Specialist, Forage Production)
Matthew Romanko (Water Quality Extension Associate)
Matthew Schmerge (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Mike Estadt (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Mike Gastier, CCA (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Rachel Cochran (Water Quality Extension Associate)
Sam Custer (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Sarah Noggle (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Steve Culman (State Specialist, Soil Fertility)
Ted Wiseman (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Tony Nye (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Trevor Corboy (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)
Will Hamman (Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources)

Disclaimer

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.