Manure Drag Hose Plot Results

The 2015 growing season was the 2nd year for a corn post-emergent drag hose study at the OARDC Northwest branch at Holtville. The purpose of this plot is to determine how far along in development the corn crop can be before the damage from a drag hose would rule out sidedressing emerged corn with livestock manure. A 15 foot long drag hose filled with water was used for this study.

The six-inch diameter drag hose was pulled across each plot twice (going in opposite directions) at corn vegetative growth stages one through five (stage five was not completed in 2015 due to excessive rainfall). The tractor speed was approximately 4 miles per hour. The plot was replicated four times in a randomized block design.

The 2014 plot experienced an unusually dry growing season, especially in the weeks following the drag hose treatments. Total precipitation received by this plot from planting until October 1st was 11.62 inches. The 2015 plot experienced an unusually wet growing season, especially in the weeks during the drag hose treatments. Total precipitation received by this plot from planting until October 1st was 22.12 inches.

 

Corn stage

Population

2014

Yield bu/ac

2014

Population 2015

Yield bu/ac

2015

2-year average

Bu/ac

No drag hose

30,166

145.1

31,850

167.2

156.2

V1

29,660

154.3

31,750

166.1

160.2

V2

30,166

157.9

32,000

153.3

155.6

V3

28,933

153.9

31,375

172.3

163.1

V4

29,264

149.7

23,500

123.5

136.7

V5

15,366

109.8

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The results of this two-year research study suggests corn could be sidedressed with liquid livestock manure, using a drag hose, up to growth stage three (three leaf collars) without a statistically significant yield loss. This study will be repeated in next three seasons to establish a five-year data base.

Drag hose corn sidedress from 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oze7YTO4mu4

Drag hose corn sidedress 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyHmlpP4rB8

Thanks to the Ohio Pork Producers, the Ohio Dairy Research Fund, the Ohio Corn Marketing Program, the Ohio Soybean Council, and the Ohio Environmental Educational Fund for supporting this research.

Crop Observation and Recommendation Network

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

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