Corn Disease

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Disease Risk. In Ohio, several foliar diseases are of greater concern in late-planted corn for a number of reasons, including: 1 – for diseases like gray leaf spot (GLS), northern corn leaf blight (NCLB), and eye spot that are caused by pathogens that overwinter in corn stubble, delayed planting allows more time for inoculum (spores) to buildup, especially in no-till, corn-on-corn fields and 2 – for diseases like common and southern rust that are caused by pathogens that do not overwinter in Ohio, planting late allows more time for spore fo

    Issue: 2019-23
  2. The Western Agricultural Research Station Agronomy Field Day will be held July 17th. The station is mostly planted but everything went in on the edge – as you saw it on your farm too. Hear our researchers thoughts and recommendations on how to manage this interesting season.

    A couple of items we will walk through are:

    Issue: 2019:20
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    A national group of plant pathologists, including Pierce Paul from The Ohio State University, will be presenting a two-part webinar series to help U.S. wheat producers management Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as head scab or scab. FHB affect wheat, barley and other small grain crops, reducing yield and contaminating grain with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol, AKA vomitoxin.

    Issue: 2019-03
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Felipe Dalla Lana da Silva

    Over the last few weeks, we have received samples with at least four different types of ear rots – Diplodia, Gibberella, Fusarium, and Trichoderma. Of these, Diplodia ear rot seems to be the most prevalent. Ear rots differ from each other in terms of the damage they cause (their symptoms), the toxins they produce, and the specific conditions under which they develop.

    Issue: 2018-28
  5. grey leaf spot
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Foliar diseases, especially Gray Leaf Spot (GLS), are beginning to show up in some corn fields. This is not at all surprising, given that the crop was planted relatively late and it has been wet and humid in some areas. GLS is favored by humid conditions, particularly if temperatures are between 70 and 90 F. Foliar diseases of corn are generally a concern when they develop early and progress up the plant before grain fill is complete. This is especially true when the hybrid is susceptible. In most years, GLS and NCLB usually develop late or remain restricted to the lower leaves.

    Issue: 2018-20

Publications

  1. Abnormal Ear Diagnosis Poster,  ACE-1. Farmers frequently encounter abnormal corn ears in their fields when the crop has experienced a major stress, such as drought, temperature extremes, disease, insect injury, or misapplied chemicals. These abnormalities often affect yield and grain quality adversely. In this poster, ten abnormal corn ears with distinct symptoms and causes are highlighted.

  2. Corn Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 804. Five to 15 percent of Ohio's corn crop is lost to disease each year, amounting to nearly $100 million in lost farm income. Corn diseases include seedling diseases, leaf blights, stalk rots, ear and kernel rots, and viruses. This bulletin describes the disease symptoms, provides color images, gives the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting corn in Ohio.

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