Corn Disease

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    On Feb 11, 2021, I gave a talk entitled “Management of Gibberella ear rot and Vomitoxin in Corn with Fungicides: Lessons Learned from Head Scab” as part of the 2021 Virtual Corn and Soybean School. I summarized years of fungicide efficacy research on head scab, a disease of wheat caused by the same fungus (Fusarium graminearum [Gibberella zeae]) that causes Gibberella ear rot (GER) in corn.

    Issue: 2021-04
  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    If your grain was harvested from a field with Gibberella ear rot (GER), it is more than likely contaminated with mycotoxins. Deoxynivalenol, also known as vomitoxin, is one of the mycotoxins most commonly produced by the fungus Fusarium graminearum that causes GER. Another name for this fungus is Gibberella zeae, hence the name of the disease. Before storing grain harvested from GER-affected fields or areas where conditions were favorable for the disease, pull a sample and test for the presence and level of contamination with vomitoxin.

    Issue: 2021-02
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Felipe Dalla Lana da Silva , Author(s): Dee Jepsen

    Moldy Field CornHarvesting, Sampling, and Testing: This year, slow grain dry-down, delayed harvest, and late-season rainfall have led to fairly high levels of one or more ear rots (Gibberella, Fusarium, Diplodia and Trichoderma) in some corn fields.

    Issue: 2020-38
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Corn harvest is progressing very slowly across the state as the crop is taking unusually long to dry down this year. The longer the crop stays in the field, there greater the risk of late-season diseases such as ear and stalk rots, especially if it continues to rain. Stalk rot often refers to a combination of several interrelated problems, including stalk breakage, stalk lodging, premature plant death, and root lodging. Several factors may contribute to stalk rot, including extreme weather conditions, inadequate fertilization, problems with nutrient uptake, insects, and diseases.

    Issue: 2020-36
  5. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Felipe Dalla Lana da Silva

    Over the last two weeks, we have received samples or pictures of at least two different types of corn ear rots – Gibberella and Trichoderma. Of the two, Gibberella ear rot (GER) seems to be the most prevalent. Ear rots differ from each other in terms of the damage they cause (their symptoms), the toxins they produce, and the specific conditions under which they develop. GER leads to grain contamination with mycotoxins, including deoxynivalenol (also known as vomitoxin), and is favored by warm, wet, or humid conditions between silk emergence (R1) and early grain development.

    Issue: 2020-34

Publications

  1. Abnormal Ear Diagnosis Poster,  ACE-1. Farmers frequently encounter abnormal corn ears in their fields when the crop has experienced a major stress, such as drought, temperature extremes, disease, insect injury, or misapplied chemicals. These abnormalities often affect yield and grain quality adversely. In this poster, ten abnormal corn ears with distinct symptoms and causes are highlighted.

  2. Corn Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 804. Five to 15 percent of Ohio's corn crop is lost to disease each year, amounting to nearly $100 million in lost farm income. Corn diseases include seedling diseases, leaf blights, stalk rots, ear and kernel rots, and viruses. This bulletin describes the disease symptoms, provides color images, gives the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting corn in Ohio.

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