C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    A national group of plant pathologists, including Pierce Paul from The Ohio State University, will be presenting a two-part webinar series to help U.S. wheat producers management Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as head scab or scab. FHB affect wheat, barley and other small grain crops, reducing yield and contaminating grain with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol, AKA vomitoxin.

    Issue: 2019-03
  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Felipe Dalla Lana da Silva

    Over the last few weeks, we have received samples with at least four different types of ear rots – Diplodia, Gibberella, Fusarium, and Trichoderma. Of these, Diplodia ear rot seems to be the most prevalent. Ear rots differ from each other in terms of the damage they cause (their symptoms), the toxins they produce, and the specific conditions under which they develop.

    Issue: 2018-28
  3. grey leaf spot
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Foliar diseases, especially Gray Leaf Spot (GLS), are beginning to show up in some corn fields. This is not at all surprising, given that the crop was planted relatively late and it has been wet and humid in some areas. GLS is favored by humid conditions, particularly if temperatures are between 70 and 90 F. Foliar diseases of corn are generally a concern when they develop early and progress up the plant before grain fill is complete. This is especially true when the hybrid is susceptible. In most years, GLS and NCLB usually develop late or remain restricted to the lower leaves.

    Issue: 2018-20
  4. Early Corn Coloration – Green, Purple, or Yellow?
    Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Corn seedlings often turn yellow (due to low nitrogen uptake and/or limited chlorophyll synthesis) or purple (reduced root development and/or increased anthocyanin production) under cool, wet conditions. Some hybrids are more likely to increase anthocyanin (purple pigment) content when plants are cool. Yellowing or purpling of corn plants at this stage of development generally has little or no effect on later crop performance or yield potential.

    Issue: 2018-16
  5. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    With corn now beyond the R4 growth state in most fields, there is really nothing you can do about southern rust in terms of fungicide application. However, correct diagnosis of this disease is still very important from the standpoint of identifying the hybrids that were most severely affected. Although our growing conditions generally do not favor this disease and we may go for another several years without seeing as much southern rust as we did in 2017, we still need to identify those highly susceptible hybrids.

    Issue: 2017-30
  6. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Both southern and common rust have been confirmed in multiple corn fields across the state, but as is usually the case in Ohio, the latter is much more wide-spread than the former, and most of the affected fields are in the southern half of the state. Southern rust is characterized by the presence of small, circular, light orangish pustules predominantly on the upper surface of the leaves, whereas common rust produces larger, more elongated, and darker (cinnamon-brown) pustules on both leaf surfaces.

    Issue: 2017-24
  7. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Ohio corn producers are reporting more rust on corn this year, and are concerned that it might be southern rust, the rarer but more damaging of the two major rust diseases that affect corn in state. Based on the fact that they both produce rusty looking pustules on the leaves, producers may actually be confusing common rust with southern rust, especially when they are not occurring side-by-side on the same leaf. The table below provides some key differences between the two based on the characteristics of visual symptoms and conditions favorable for development:    

    Issue: 2017-22
  8. field day
    Author(s): Amanda Douridas

    Join specialists in the field this summer to see hands on what insect and disease pressure is present. The specialists will help participants identify insects and diseases and then discuss management strategies. The series begins with a Pasture Walk on May 23 at 5:30 pm. The field borders the Ohio Caverns so an optional group tour of the Caverns has been set up at 4pm ($15).

    Issue: 2017-12
  9. Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    The annual Northwest Ohio Corn & Soybean Day is scheduled for Friday, January 20th in Founders Hall at Sauder Village in Archbold from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The program has a variety of speakers, a farmer to farmer panel made up of local producers and nearly 30 exhibitors sharing information on management practices for the 2017 crop production season. This year’s Corn/Soybean Day offers the 3 hour Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training, (FACT), pesticide applicator credits for private and commercial applicators and CCA credits.

     

    Issue: 2016-40
  10. Author(s): Amanda Bennett

    Ohio State University Extension announces a series of four webinars available to producers, Certified Crop Advisers and industry offered throughout January and February 2017. The Corn, Soybean and Wheat Connection series is scheduled to begin on January 24, 2017 and will focus on issues and updates in grain crop production. Each webinar will begin at 7:00 p.m. and can be view at several host sites across the state or from your home computer. Certified Crop Adviser credits will be available each evening at physical locations only.

    Issue: 2016-40

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