Corn Growth and Development

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Bruce Ackley

    Alyssa Lamb, and Alison Peart

    Issue: 2018-28
  2. Photo credit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP2JyJOFmRk
    Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    Persistent rains during the past two weeks have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

    Issue: 2018-19
  3. Early Corn Coloration – Green, Purple, or Yellow?
    Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Corn seedlings often turn yellow (due to low nitrogen uptake and/or limited chlorophyll synthesis) or purple (reduced root development and/or increased anthocyanin production) under cool, wet conditions. Some hybrids are more likely to increase anthocyanin (purple pigment) content when plants are cool. Yellowing or purpling of corn plants at this stage of development generally has little or no effect on later crop performance or yield potential.

    Issue: 2018-16
  4. Interveinal leaf striping often variable across fields. Source: B. McDonald, 2018
    Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Leaf striping (interveinal chlorosis) in corn is appearing in many Ohio fields.  There are several nutrient deficiencies (including sulfur, zinc, magnesium, and manganese) that result in leaf striping and some of these look similar. The severity of the striping may vary considerably within a field and may be associated with differences in soil pH, organic matter, compaction, tillage, temperature and moisture. Bright yellow to white interveinal striping running the length of leaves may be the result of “genetic stripe”, but it’s usually limited to scattered plants within a field.

    Issue: 2018-16
  5. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Steve Culman

    Additional Author: Taylor Dill

    Around the state, there are many corn fields with young plants with standing water due to the intense storms that have passed through. But what are the long-term effects of standing water on emerged corn? Preliminary data from two locations in Ohio in 2017 suggests that as long as a sidedress N application can be made following the waterlogging, yield loss may be minimal if the waterlogged conditions lasted 4 days or less.

    Issue: 2018-15
Subscribe to RSS - Corn Growth and Development