C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    As the weather has turned warm this past week, many of our fields planted in April/early May should be emerged or be in the process of emerging. Cool temperatures paired with rain over the last few weeks may have resulted in seeds sitting in the ground longer than expected, or some fields experiencing imbibitional chilling or surface crusting as the soil dried. These conditions could result in stand reductions by preventing seeds from successfully germinating and emerging (Fig. 1).

    Issue: 2021-15
  2. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA

    When we examine crop emergence post-planting, two factors can impact speed of emergence – soil moisture content and soil temperatures. If soil temperatures are lower, it can take more calendar days for emergence to occur meaning rowing corn may take a little more time. In the Ohio Agronomy Guide, emergence should begin to occur after approximately 100 air GDDs.

    Issue: 2021-13
  3. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    As fall is progressing, crop harvest is also occurring throughout the state. However, many producers are seeing slower than usual drydown in their corn fields this October. This may be in part due to how the weather conditions impacted corn growth and development this year.

    Issue: 2020-36
  4. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    As temperatures remain hot for much of the state, corn continues to put on leaf collars and is approaching the start of flowering. Corn is a plant that has separate male (anthers on the tassel) and female (silks in the ear) flowers, and it is critical that the timing of flower emergence and activity overlap (sometimes referred to as the ‘nicking’ period) to ensure good pollination and kernel set. Another term used for flowering synchrony is the ‘anthesis-silking interval,’ which is the time from pollen shedding to silk emergence.

    Issue: 2020-22
  5. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In recent days we have been experiencing 90 degree F days with limited precipitation, and so we are starting to see some leaf rolling in corn. Some of this may be related to reductions in soil moisture, but may be related to restricted root systems as well. Depending on the stage of corn at the time of these conditions, different effects on yield may be expected. Corn ear development occurs throughout the growing season, and extreme temperature or moisture stress at different growth stages will decrease different aspects of grain yield.

    Issue: 2020-21
  6. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Bruce Ackley

    Alyssa Lamb, and Alison Peart

    Issue: 2018-28
  7. Photo credit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP2JyJOFmRk
    Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    Persistent rains during the past two weeks have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

    Issue: 2018-19
  8. Early Corn Coloration – Green, Purple, or Yellow?
    Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Corn seedlings often turn yellow (due to low nitrogen uptake and/or limited chlorophyll synthesis) or purple (reduced root development and/or increased anthocyanin production) under cool, wet conditions. Some hybrids are more likely to increase anthocyanin (purple pigment) content when plants are cool. Yellowing or purpling of corn plants at this stage of development generally has little or no effect on later crop performance or yield potential.

    Issue: 2018-16
  9. Interveinal leaf striping often variable across fields. Source: B. McDonald, 2018
    Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Leaf striping (interveinal chlorosis) in corn is appearing in many Ohio fields.  There are several nutrient deficiencies (including sulfur, zinc, magnesium, and manganese) that result in leaf striping and some of these look similar. The severity of the striping may vary considerably within a field and may be associated with differences in soil pH, organic matter, compaction, tillage, temperature and moisture. Bright yellow to white interveinal striping running the length of leaves may be the result of “genetic stripe”, but it’s usually limited to scattered plants within a field.

    Issue: 2018-16
  10. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Steve Culman

    Additional Author: Taylor Dill

    Around the state, there are many corn fields with young plants with standing water due to the intense storms that have passed through. But what are the long-term effects of standing water on emerged corn? Preliminary data from two locations in Ohio in 2017 suggests that as long as a sidedress N application can be made following the waterlogging, yield loss may be minimal if the waterlogged conditions lasted 4 days or less.

    Issue: 2018-15

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