Corn Harvest

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Corn Trial
    Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): David Lohnes , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide).  Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.

    Issue: 2018-40
  2. Combine and Semi-truck
    Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer

    Results from the 2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test are now available on line at:  http://oardc.osu.edu/corntrials

    Issue: 2018-38
  3. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Rich Minyo

    Leaving corn to dry in the field exposes a crop to unfavorable weather conditions, as well as wildlife damage. A crop with weak plant integrity is more vulnerable to yield losses from stalk lodging and ear drop when weathering conditions occur. Additional losses may occur when ear rots reduce grain quality and can lead to significant dockage when the grain is marketed. Some ear rots produce mycotoxins, which may cause major health problems if fed to livestock.

    Issue: 2018-35
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    We have received several reports of premature corn kernel sprouting across Ohio. The ear in the picture exhibiting premature sprouting was sampled from one of the Ohio Corn Performance Test plots at the NW Research Station and was associated Trichoderma ear rot. In this particular case, the fungus that causes the ear rot produces compounds that stimulates early germination. However, not all ear rots are commonly associated with premature sprouting. In fact, under the right set of conditions, this phenomenon may occur in perfectly healthy ears, without visual disease symptoms.

    Issue: 2018-33
  5. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Poor stalk quality is being observed and reported in Ohio corn fields. One of the primary causes of this problem is stalk rot. Corn stalk rot, and consequently, lodging, are the results of several different but interrelated factors. The actual disease, stalk rot, is caused by one or more of several fungi capable of colonizing and disintegrating of the inner tissues of the stalk. The most common members of the stalk rot complex are Gibberella zeae, Colletotrichum graminicola, Stenocarpella maydis and members of the genus Fusarium.

    Issue: 2018-33
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