Corn Harvest

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Stan Smith , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    We’ve recently heard comments and questions concerning the varying levels of grain protein levels being found in shelled corn. Some feed companies have reported seeing many samples in the upper 6% and lower 7% protein range this year but there are reports of levels that are nearly 9%. Some feed mill operations are using 7% as the default value based on this year and last year’s levels. However, in the past, higher grain protein levels (% +2) have been cited for corn. Are the reports of low levels in 2016 and 2017 an anomaly?

    Issue: 2018-01
  2. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): David Lohnes , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In 2017, 205 corn hybrids representing 25 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide). Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.

    Issue: 2017-40
  3. Combine Shelling Corn
    Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Results from the 2017 Ohio Corn Performance Test are now available on line at: http://oardc.osu.edu/corntrials

    Issue: 2017-39
  4. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    According to the USDA/NASS (https://www.nass.usda.gov/) as of Sunday, Oct. 15, 21 percent of Ohio’s corn was harvested for grain, compared to 34 percent for last year and 32 percent for the five-year average. Wet weather delayed corn harvest across the state and is not helping with field drying. Some growers are delaying harvest until grain moisture drops further. However, these delays increase the likelihood that stalk rots present in many fields will lead to stalk lodging problems.

    Issue: 2017-35
  5. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    The recent cooler than normal temperatures may impact corn drydown. Once corn achieves physiological maturity (when kernels have obtained maximum dry weight and black layer has formed), it will normally dry approximately 3/4 to 1% per day during favorable drying weather (sunny and breezy) during the early warmer part of the harvest season from mid‑September through late September. By early to mid‑October, dry-down rates will usually drop to ½ to 3/4% per day.

    Issue: 2017-30
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