C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA , Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    Lead Author: Adrian Pekarcik

    Issue: 2018-15
  2. Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Andy Michel

    Corn producers have many hybrids to choose from including those with transgenic traits for insect management. However, the array of trait packages and what they are best suited for can be hard to keep track of. The “Handy Bt Trait Table” for U.S. corn production provides a helpful list of trade names and details of their trait packages, including which Bt proteins and herbicide traits they contain, what insects they are marketed to control, refuge requirements, and which insects have developed resistance to them in at least some regions. This table is produced by Dr.

    Issue: 2017-41
  3. Author(s): Amy Raudenbush , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Andy Michel

    Participators: Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Amanda Bennett, JD Bethel, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Thomas Dehaas, Allen Gahler, Mike Gastier, Jason Hartschuh, Ed Lentz, Rory Lewandowski, Cecelia Lokai-Minnich, David Marrison, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, Adrian Pekarcik, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, John Schoenhals, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, Curtis  Young, Chris Zoller

    Issue: 2017-29
  4. Western bean cutworm adult
    Author(s): Amy Raudenbush , Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    This is the final week for WBCW trap monitoring in Ohio as very few numbers are being reported in trap counts across the state. We would like to thank everyone for their participation including land owners and farm cooperators who allowed us to place traps in their fields and monitor WBCW this season. For week ending August 25th, a total of 61 traps were monitored in 19 counties. Overall, 21 WBCW adults were captured, with 12 counties reporting a “zero” for their trap count.

    Issue: 2017-28
  5. Western bean cutworm adult
    Author(s): Amy Raudenbush , Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    We are nearing the end of WBCW trap monitoring in Ohio as trap counts continue to decrease across the state. A total of 71 traps were monitored in 23 counties. Overall, 138 WBCW adults were captured, with 11 counties reporting a “zero” for their trap count. The state average also continues to decrease from 5 WBCW (week ending August 11) to 2 WBCW (week ending August 18).

    Issue: 2017-27
  6. Western bean cutworm adult
    Author(s): Amy Raudenbush , Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    Western bean cutworm (WBCW) populations continue to decrease across monitoring counties in Ohio. A total of 80 traps were monitored in 22 counties. Overall, 370 WBCW adults were captured. The state average also continues to decrease from 9 WBCW (week ending August 4) to 5 WBCW (week ending August 11).

    Issue: 2017-26
  7. Author(s): Amy Raudenbush

    Western bean cutworm (WBCW) populations decreased for all monitoring counties in Ohio for week ending August 4. A total of 72 traps were monitored in 23 counties. Overall, 653 WBCW adults were captured. The state average per trap decreased from 21 WBCW (week ending July 28) to 9 WBCW (week ending July 28).

    Issue: 2017-25
  8. Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Andy Michel

    assisted by Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, JD Bethel, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Thomas Dehaas, Allen Gahler, Jason Hartschuh, Ed Lentz, Rory Lewandowski, David Marrison, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, Adrian Pekarcik, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, John Schoenhals, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, Curtis Young, Chris Zoller.

    Issue: 2017-24
  9. with assistance from Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, JD Bethel, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Thomas Dehaas, Allen Gahler, Mike Gastier, Ed Lentz, Rory Lewandowski, David Marrison, Cecelia Lokai-Minnich, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, Adrian Pekarcik, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, John Schoenhals, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, Chris Zoller

    Issue: 2017-23
  10. Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    We have received many reports of Japanese beetles and other defoliators munching on soybean over the past few weeks with some reaching economic levels of defoliation. Like a few other insects Japanese beetles are “buffet style” eaters, they have many plants that they can feed on, including corn. On corn, much of the feeding occurs on silks where they chew the silks back to the ear tip and can interfere with pollination. Another well-known insect that can feed on silks is the adult corn rootworm (mainly the Western corn rootworm) that should begin emerging soon, if not already.

    Issue: 2017-22

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