Corn Silage

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Cows Eating Silage
    Author(s): Bill Weiss , Author(s): Mark Sulc

    Too Wet?

    Issue: 2019 - 32
  2. Corn stalks with immature ear

    Corn silage is an important component of many dairy and beef cattle rations.  The goal is to make a high-quality feedstuff, but to achieve this requires planning before harvest, monitoring plant moisture, good harvest practices, and good storage management.  Our 2019 corn silage harvest presents some challenges, specifically the late planted corn that will be harvested in an immature state with little to no grain production.

    Issue: 2019 - 29
  3. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In 2018, 63 corn silage hybrids representing 16 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The trials were divided into two maturity groups designated early and full season on the basis of the relative maturity (RM) submitted by the companies with results listed in separate tables.  The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County).

    Issue: 2019-01
  4. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe

    In 2017, 50 corn silage hybrids representing 15 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The trials were divided into two maturity groups designated early and late on the basis of the relative maturity (RM) submitted by the companies with results listed in separate tables. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites were located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.

    Issue: 2018-01
  5. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer

    In 2016, 47 corn silage hybrids representing 16 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites were located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.  The test results from the three 2016 locations are treated as one region.

    Issue: 2017-2
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