C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe

    In 2017, 50 corn silage hybrids representing 15 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The trials were divided into two maturity groups designated early and late on the basis of the relative maturity (RM) submitted by the companies with results listed in separate tables. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites were located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.

    Issue: 2018-01
  2. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer

    In 2016, 47 corn silage hybrids representing 16 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites were located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.  The test results from the three 2016 locations are treated as one region.

    Issue: 2017-2
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    More and more reports are coming in of corn testing positive for vomitoxin, with levels as high as 6-10 ppm in some cases. Some of these numbers are taking producers by surprise. Although the weather has been favorable for ear rot development, and consequently, grain contamination with vomitoxin, test results could be misleading in some cases, and may even be incorrect. Since there is not a lot you can do about grain contaminated with mycotoxins, you should at least check to make sure that you got a fair test.

    Issue: 2016-36
  4. Rain has been spotty across much of Ohio this summer and there are areas where corn was under moisture stress during the critical pollination period.  As a result, this drought stressed corn has poor grain development and small cobs.  Much of this corn may end up chopped for corn silage.  Typically the most frequent questions about using drought stressed corn for corn silage revolve around nitrate toxicity, expected yield and quality.

    Issue: 2016-27
  5. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Have very dry soil conditions increased the potential for toxic levels of nitrates in corn harvested for silage? Nitrates absorbed from the soil by plant roots are normally incorporated into plant tissue as amino acids, proteins and other nitrogenous compounds. Thus, the concentration of nitrate in the plant is usually low. The primary site for converting nitrates to these products is in growing green leaves. Under unfavorable growing conditions, especially drought, this conversion process is retarded, causing nitrate to accumulate in the stalks, stems and other conductive tissue.

    Issue: 2016-25
  6. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Bill Widdicombe , Author(s): Allen Geyer

    In 2015, 38 corn silage hybrids representing 13 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites were located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.  The test results from the three 2015 locations are treated as one region.

    Issue: 2016-1
  7. Author(s): Bill Weiss , Author(s): Dianne Shoemaker

    1. Estimate grain yield using the Thomison (2013) method (see link below) or other approach.

    2. On average, in the lower Midwest, you get about 1 ton of corn silage (35% dry matter (DM)) per 7.5 to 8 bushels of corn.  Therefore, if the estimated grain yield is140 bu/acre, expected silage yield would be 140/8 = 17.5 tons.

    3. However, under abnormal growing conditions this may underestimate forage yield (i.e., there will be less than 8 bu of grain per ton). See methods in the corn silage pricing article (link below.)

    Issue: 2015-24
  8. Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In 2014, 53 corn silage hybrids representing 16 commercial brands were evaluated in a joint trial with Michigan State University (MSU). One Ohio location is combined with Michigan's two southern (Zone 1) silage locations. The Ohio test site was located in our Northwest Region at Hoytville (Wood County). The two MSU sites are located in Branch and Lenawee counties, which are on the Ohio/Michigan state line.  The test results from the three 2014 locations are treated as one region.

    Issue: 2015-03
  9. Author(s): Normand St-Pierre , Author(s): Bill Weiss , Author(s): Dianne Shoemaker

    If it’s late summer it’s time to talk about pricing a corn crop standing in the field for corn silage.  This is always a challenging question as there are a number of factors that contribute to the final price agreed upon by the buyer and seller that are challenging to quantify. 

    Issue: 2014-32