C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Last week, I received reports of several ear oddities showing up in corn fields including the following:

    Shortened husk leaves with normal ears protruding beyond the husks

    Most corn fields have a few ears with exposed tips. In extreme situations, a high proportion of ears outgrow husks by 1/3 to 1/2. According to Aldrich et al., 1986, Modern Corn Production, observed this where “… extreme [drought] prevailed during the time of ear set with abundant rainfall and good growing conditions thereafter.”

    Issue: 2019 - 29
  2. Author(s): Cassandra Brown

    For decades, consumer demand for organic food has grown annually by double-digits. (1) While still a comparatively small portion of overall agricultural production, organic corn acreage in the U.S. increased by more than 55% between 2011 and 2016, driven mainly by demand from organic dairy farms.

    Issue: 2019-27
  3. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Persistent rains during May and early June have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

    Issue: 2019:17
  4. Corn Trial
    Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): David Lohnes , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide).  Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.

    Issue: 2018-40
  5. Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    As producers are planning their seed needs for next year, it is important to think about acreage, hybrids, and seeding rates. Finding the best corn seeding rate is important for efficient production, but the “optimum” corn seeding rate – the one that maximizes profitability – can vary within and among fields with small differences in soils and weather.

    Issue: 2018-38
  6. Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

     

     

  7. Learn about precision nutrient placement at this year’s NW Ohio Corn-Soybean Day in Archbold
    Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    The annual Northwest Ohio Corn & Soybean Day is scheduled for Friday, January 19th in Founders Hall at Sauder Village in Archbold from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The program has a variety of speakers, a farmer/retailer re-certification credits and nearly 30 exhibitors sharing information on management practices for the 2018 crop production season. This year’s Corn/Soybean Day offers the three-hour Pesticide applicator re-certification (CORE, 1, 2, 6) plus one hour of re-certification for fertilizer applicators (15) as well as 4 hours of Certified Crop Advisor (CCA) credits.

    Issue: 2017-40
  8. The Farm Science Review will be held again this year at the London, Ohio location. Dates are September 19, 20 and 21. See http://fsr.osu.edu for more information. Harvest has not quite stared yet so you should have the time to check in.

    The Agronomic Crops Team (http://agcrops.osu.edu) will once again be welcoming visitors on the east side of the grounds between the parking lot and the exhibit area.

    Issue: 2017-30
  9. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    According to the USDA/NASS (https://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ohio/Publications/Crop_Progress_&_Condition/2017/cw2117oh.pdf), for the week ending May 21, corn was 73 percent planted, which was 24 percent ahead of last year and the same as the five-year average. 

    Issue: 2017-14
  10. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Allen Geyer

    According to the USDA/NASS (https://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ohio/Publications/Crop_Progress_&_Condition/2017/cw2117oh.pdf), for the week ending May 21, corn was 73 percent planted, which was 24 percent ahead of last year and the same as the five-year average.  However, at this time, it is unknown what percent of the earlier planted corn has been or will be replanted due to excessive soil moisture, freezing temperatures and frosts, fu

    Issue: 2017-14

Pages