C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Tables 1 & 2
    Author(s): Rich Minyo , Author(s): Allen Geyer , Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): David Lohnes

    In 2016, 212 corn hybrids representing 26 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide). Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments.

    Issue: 2016-39
  2. Author(s): Mark Badertscher

    Are you thinking about switching to no-till and have some questions you need answered before taking the leap?  Maybe you‘ve been planting no-till soybeans for years and are thinking about adapting this practice to corn.  Adopting no-till requires understanding how it affects drainage, soil structure, organic matter, weed control, and the application of pesticides and chemical fertilizers, all of which influence both yields and environmental impacts.

    Issue: 2016-26
  3. The primary causes of grain spoilage during storage are excess moisture and high temperature. However, insects can infest any grain that is not handled properly or that is stored longer than 6 months. Damage from weevils or other stored grain insects can be costly. Unfortunately, they often are discovered when grain is being taken out of the bin. At that point, the damage has been done and there are few control options.

    Issue: 2016-26
  4. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Drought and heat adversely affected ear and kernel formation in many Ohio corn fields this year. Poor ear and kernel development is associated with variability in plant growth within fields that is related to differences in soil moisture.   In some areas within fields subject to protracted dry conditions, ears are absent (“barren”) or severely reduced in size with a few scattered kernels (nubbin ears). Where the impact of drought was less pronounced and plant height and color look normal or near normal, ear cob size may be normal but kernel number is markedly reduced.

    Issue: 2016-26
  5. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Rainfall over the past weekend helped some drought stressed corn fields, especially late plantings, but it may have been too late for others.  Prior to this rainfall, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 46 percent of Ohio was rated as in “moderate drought” (https://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ohio/Publications/Crop_Progress_&_Condition/index.php). That area covered most of northern Ohio.

    Issue: 2016-25
  6. Author(s): Peter Thomison , Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Have very dry soil conditions increased the potential for toxic levels of nitrates in corn harvested for silage? Nitrates absorbed from the soil by plant roots are normally incorporated into plant tissue as amino acids, proteins and other nitrogenous compounds. Thus, the concentration of nitrate in the plant is usually low. The primary site for converting nitrates to these products is in growing green leaves. Under unfavorable growing conditions, especially drought, this conversion process is retarded, causing nitrate to accumulate in the stalks, stems and other conductive tissue.

    Issue: 2016-25
  7. Agronomists , CCAs and custom applicators are invited to the Farm Science Review Agronomy College, hosted by the Ohio AgriBusiness Association in partnership with Ohio State University Extension and the Farm Science Review staff. The program will bring industry experts, OSU researchers, and agronomy service providers together to enhance collective knowledge and learning at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio, on Sept. 13 - one week before the start of the annual three-day farm show.

    Issue: 2016-24
  8. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Tassel Ears” (Figure 1) are showing up in corn fields around Ohio. Corn is the only major field crop characterized by separate male and female flowering structures, the tassel and ear, respectively. In most corn fields it is not unusual to find a few scattered plants with a combination tassel and ear in the same structure - a "tassel ear". The ear portion of this tassel ear structure usually contains only a limited number of kernels.

    Issue: 2016-23
  9. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Editor's Note:  This is a synopsis of the article last week from Peter Thomison, with the pictures attached.  I've included a bit of the information to "explain" the images, but if you want "The Whole Story," please refer to last week's CORN Newsletter (2016-20).

     

     

    Issue: 2016-21
  10. Author(s): Peter Thomison

    When estimating yield losses in corn due to hail, frost, and other types of plant injury, it’s essential to establish the stage of plant growth at the time damage occurred. It’s also important to know corn stage of development in order to apply post-emergence chemicals effectively with minimum crop damage. Counting leaf collars to determine the vegetative stage is feasible until the lower leaves can no longer be identified. At about the V6 stage, increasing stalk and nodal growth combine to tear the smallest lower leaves from the plant.

    Issue: 2016-14

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