Forages

For the OSU Horticulture & Crop Science Forages website, please visit http://forages.osu.edu/.

Forage Performance Trials Report: u.osu.edu/perf

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Alfalfa plant
    Author(s): Mark Sulc

    Livestock owners feeding forage need to keep in mind potential for some forage toxicity issues late this season. Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning potential associated with drought stress or frost are the main concerns to be aware of, and these are primarily an issue with annual forages and several weed species, but nitrates can be an issue even in perennial forages when they are drought stressed. A few legumes species have an increased risk of causing bloat when grazed after a frost. Each of these risks is discussed in this article along with precautions to avoid them.

    Issue: 2019 - 33
  2. Author(s): Bill Weiss

    To make good silage from summer annuals such as sorghum, sudangrass, and pearl millet, the dry matter concentration should be between about 30% to 40% (moisture contents of 60 to 70%). Silage made wetter can seep which causes a loss of nutrients and potential environmental damage if the seepage gets into surface water (fish kill). Silage made drier will not pack adequately and may heat during storage. In some situations, heat generation can be great enough to start a fire within the silage mass. The drier the silage, the greater the risk for a silo fire.

    Issue: 2019 - 33
  3. Hay Bale
    Author(s): Mark Sulc

    How to value a standing hay or haylage crop for sale directly from the field prior to harvest can be challenging.  Assigning an appropriate value includes the buyer and seller first agreeing on the market value for the hay and then adjusting for harvest costs and other factors that contribute to the price of hay sold in the open market, some of which are challenging to quantify.

    Issue: 2019 - 32
  4. Author(s): Mark Sulc

    Many producers in Ohio have planted summer annual grasses this year to increase their low forage inventories. These include sudangrass, sorghum-sudangrass, forage sorghum, pearl millet, and teff grass.

    Issue: 2019 - 29
  5. Author(s): Mark Sulc , Author(s): Rory Lewandowski, CCA

    The best time to take a last harvest of forages is this week and next in Ohio, for the least risk to the long-term health of the stand. This is especially true for alfalfa and other legumes that need the fall period to replenish carbohydrate and protein reserves in the taproots that are used for winter survival and regrowth next spring. This fall rest period is particularly important this year, because our surviving stands have suffered a great deal of wet soil stress this year.

    Issue: 2019 - 29

Publications

  1. 01/2011

    Control of Insect Pests of Field Crops, Bulletin 545. Gives detailed information on pest control thresholds and insecticide options for management of insects in corn, soybean, wheat and alfalfa.

  2. 06/2014

    Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide, Bulletin 827.Looking for a handy guide to take to the field to diagnosis various pest and production problems? This guide is the answer and is new for 2014! You will want one of these guides in the truck and maybe a second in the tractor.

  3. 12/2016

    Ohio, Indiana and Illinois Weed Control Guide, Bulletin 789. Publication gives detailed guidance on weed control selections. Numerous tables by crop and application help producers select the best product option for their weed control situation. 

  4. 04/2017

    Ohio Agronomy Guide 15th Edition, Bulletin 472. The newly revised Ohio Agronomy Guide serves as the official compilation of adaptive results and recommendations from research and educational programs. Described in this manual is information on Ohio's climate and soil, soil and water management, soil fertility, and corn, small grain, and forage crop production and management. Also, seed evaluation and weed control for the previously listed crops are discussed.

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