Forages

For the OSU Horticulture & Crop Science Forages website, please visit http://forages.osu.edu/.

Forage Performance Trials Report: u.osu.edu/perf

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Mark Sulc

    Author’s note: Most of this article is adapted with permission from an article published in Farm and Dairy on 2nd June 2010, available at http://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/make-hay-when-sun-shines-but-tak.... It certainly applies this year.

    Issue: 2019-15
  2. Author(s): Mark Sulc , Author(s): Rory Lewandowski, CCA , Author(s): Jeff Stachler

    Forage stands that have survived this year continue to advance in maturity. Some producers in northeast Ohio were able to harvest last week, and many wet-wrapped the forage. Unfortunately, in other parts of Ohio, the rains have continued, and the forecast is not good for drying conditions this week. Although forages are ready for harvesting (see table below), keep in mind that harvesting when the soil is too wet and soft will do non-reversible compaction damage to the stand and will lower the productivity the rest of this year and into future years.

    Issue: 2019-15
  3. Author(s): Mark Sulc , Author(s): Bill Weiss

    Many forage stands were damaged this past winter, and the wet spring has further deteriorated stands that appeared they might recover. It is now too risky to try to establish perennial forages, with the warmer summer weather at our doorstep. We should wait until August to establish perennial stands. Meanwhile, what options can we consider for growing forage this year?

    We are also well past the time when cool-season species like oats, triticale, Italian ryegrass, spring barley can be planted. As we move into late May and early June, we must switch to planting warm-season species.

    Issue: 2019-14
  4. Author(s): Mark Sulc , Author(s): Rory Lewandowski, CCA , Author(s): Jeff Stachler

    Many alfalfa and forage stands across the state took a beating this winter and the wet spring has added insult to injury. For weak stands, harvesting a little later than normal will help them recover. However, we’ve seen some younger stands that are looking OK and are overall growing well despite the wet weather.

    Orchardgrass was beginning to head out last week in Clark county and the alfalfa is ready or about ready for cutting (see below) in central Ohio and points to the south. Unfortunately, the rainy weather is hampering any attempts to harvest.

    Issue: 2019-14
  5. Author(s): Mark Sulc

    This month provides one of the two preferred times to seed perennial cool-season forages, the other being late summer. Two primary difficulties with spring plantings are finding a good window of opportunity when soils are dry enough before it gets too late and managing weed infestations that are usually more difficult with spring plantings. The following 10 steps will help improve your chances for successful forage establishment in the spring.

    Issue: 2019-10

Publications

  1. 01/2011

    Control of Insect Pests of Field Crops, Bulletin 545. Gives detailed information on pest control thresholds and insecticide options for management of insects in corn, soybean, wheat and alfalfa.

  2. 06/2014

    Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide, Bulletin 827.Looking for a handy guide to take to the field to diagnosis various pest and production problems? This guide is the answer and is new for 2014! You will want one of these guides in the truck and maybe a second in the tractor.

  3. 12/2016

    Ohio, Indiana and Illinois Weed Control Guide, Bulletin 789. Publication gives detailed guidance on weed control selections. Numerous tables by crop and application help producers select the best product option for their weed control situation. 

  4. 04/2017

    Ohio Agronomy Guide 15th Edition, Bulletin 472. The newly revised Ohio Agronomy Guide serves as the official compilation of adaptive results and recommendations from research and educational programs. Described in this manual is information on Ohio's climate and soil, soil and water management, soil fertility, and corn, small grain, and forage crop production and management. Also, seed evaluation and weed control for the previously listed crops are discussed.

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