Manure

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA , Author(s): Chris Zoller

    The 2019 Ohio Manure Science Review is scheduled for Wednesday, August 7 at JIMITA Holsteins, a 400-plus-acre family dairy farm at 9877 Strasburg Bolivar Road NW in Strasburg Ohio. Strasburg is about 20 miles south of Canton, Tuscarawas County, in Northeast Ohio.

    Registration is $25 by July 30; $30 after July 30; and includes coffee, doughnuts, and lunch and the afternoon tour. Participants can earn Certified Livestock Manager and Certified Crop Advisor credits.

    Issue: 2019-22
  2. Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    There have been a few phone calls from farmers calling about needing to get their fertilizer license in order to receive or spread poultry litter. This has been the law in Ohio for several years since Senate Bill 1 was passed. Any farmer handling, receiving, or applying poultry litter (or any other manure) from a permitted farm in Ohio must have either a fertilizer license or a Certified Livestock Manager certificate or be a Certified Crop Advisor. Most poultry farms in Ohio are permitted so nearly all the poultry litter available to farmers is from permitted farms.

    Issue: 2019-06
  3. Author(s): Jason Hartschuh, CCA , Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    As we continue to search for profitable ways to expand the manure application window in Ohio, we have begun to research dragline application of manure to growing soybeans. While this would potentially open up more time for manure application in the spring, our initial research goal is to look at the ability to apply manure to emerged double crop soybeans after wheat. For many years, livestock producers have successfully applied liquid manure to newly planted soybeans in July to help provide moisture for germination and emergence.

    Issue: 2019-06
  4. Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    Wheat fields will begin to firm up in Ohio and the topdressing with nitrogen fertilizer will soon start. There is usually a window of time, typically around the last week of March or the first week of April, when wheat fields are firm enough to support manure application equipment. By this date, wheat fields have broken dormancy and are actively pulling moisture and nutrients from the soil. With the limited fall and winter opportunities to apply manure to fields, many livestock farms have more manure than usual for this time of year.

    Issue: 2019-05
  5. Author(s): Glen Arnold, CCA

    This past fall was particularly tough on livestock producers and commercial manure applicators trying to land apply livestock manure. Weather conditions were warmer and wetter than normal with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) station at South Charleston recording 32 days with measurable rainfall totaling 9.91 inches in November and December. In these same two months the OARDC station at Hoytville recorded 24 days with measurable rainfall totaling 6.04 inches.

    Issue: 2019-01
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