Soybean Disease

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    We have soybeans in all different growth stages but the majority of the crop looks great but there are a few highlights based on some scouting and reports from last week.

    Issue: 2018-26
  2. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    From the scouting reports from the county educators and crop consultants – most of the soybeans in the state are very healthy with no disease symptoms.  However, as the news reports have indicated, there are a few varieties in a few locations that have higher incidence of frogeye leaf spot than we are accustomed to seeing at this growth stage – mid R2 – flowering in Ohio.  Most of the reports to date are along and south of route 70, which based on the past 12 years is where frogeye is the most common.  When this disease occurs this early in the season, where it can be readily observed, this

    Issue: 2018-21
  3. Whiskers a.k.a. conidia of Cercospora sojina that causes frogeye leaf spot
    Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Linda Weber

    Last week, samples of frogeye leaf spot of soybean were brought into the lab.  On the underside of the characteristic lesion were the conidia.  This came from an area where the incidence of frogeye was notable at the end of the season.  For the 2018 season a susceptible variety was planted back into that same field.  Environmental conditions have been favorable for this disease to begin in some areas of the state.

    Issue: 2018-19
  4. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    As farmers and consultants have been out checking their soybean stands, they are finding spots on the leaves.  The most common spotting on the unifoliates and first leaves is caused by Septoria glycines.  This is a fungus that overwinters on the previous soybean crop residue and in modern cultivars it is limited to the lower canopy.  We’ve done extensive studies on this disease over the past decade and I have yet to attribute an economic value in managing this.  We did this one experiment where put chlorothalonil on every week (not a legal application but for research purposes only

    Issue: 2018-18
  5. Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mark Loux

    It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted – for the first and only time.  Ohio’s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).  The first step is assessing overall stand health – do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?  Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate to maximize yield.

    Issue: 2018-17

Publications

  1. Managing Soybean Rust, Bulletin SR2008. Publication covers specifics of soybean rust identification and  management. General section of the publication cover the use of fungicide sin general for disease control including description of products and their activity, application information and modes of action.

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