C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Frogeye leaf spot
    Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    Several reports over the last two weeks of heavy frogeye leaf spot pressure in some fields as well as low to moderate pressure in others.  This disease will continue to increase and infect new foliage as it develops on these late planted soybeans. Based on our previous research, only once (2018) in 14 years of studies did applications at the soybean growth stage R5 contribute to preserved yield.  At the R5, the leaf at the terminal is fully developed and the pods at any one of the top four nodes is fully expanded, but the seeds are just beginning to expand.

    Issue: 2019-27
  2. The Western Agricultural Research Station Agronomy Field Day will be held July 17th. The station is mostly planted but everything went in on the edge – as you saw it on your farm too. Hear our researchers thoughts and recommendations on how to manage this interesting season.

    A couple of items we will walk through are:

    Issue: 2019:20
  3. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    Soybeans across the state range from ready to harvest to still flowering.  But in some fields, the yellowing was limited to pockets - some was sudden death syndrome or brown stem rot, charcoal rot, Phytophthora stem rot, and soybean cyst nematode.  There are some other early yellowing situations that we are still working on an accurate diagnosis, but yellowing in these cases may be linked to fertility issues and/or related to late flooding injury.  I think in 2018 we’ve observed just about everything, and it was all dependent on where in the state the soybeans were grown, how much rain occu

    Issue: 2018-29
  4. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    We have soybeans in all different growth stages but the majority of the crop looks great but there are a few highlights based on some scouting and reports from last week.

    Issue: 2018-26
  5. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    From the scouting reports from the county educators and crop consultants – most of the soybeans in the state are very healthy with no disease symptoms.  However, as the news reports have indicated, there are a few varieties in a few locations that have higher incidence of frogeye leaf spot than we are accustomed to seeing at this growth stage – mid R2 – flowering in Ohio.  Most of the reports to date are along and south of route 70, which based on the past 12 years is where frogeye is the most common.  When this disease occurs this early in the season, where it can be readily observed, this

    Issue: 2018-21
  6. Whiskers a.k.a. conidia of Cercospora sojina that causes frogeye leaf spot
    Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Linda Weber

    Last week, samples of frogeye leaf spot of soybean were brought into the lab.  On the underside of the characteristic lesion were the conidia.  This came from an area where the incidence of frogeye was notable at the end of the season.  For the 2018 season a susceptible variety was planted back into that same field.  Environmental conditions have been favorable for this disease to begin in some areas of the state.

    Issue: 2018-19
  7. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    As farmers and consultants have been out checking their soybean stands, they are finding spots on the leaves.  The most common spotting on the unifoliates and first leaves is caused by Septoria glycines.  This is a fungus that overwinters on the previous soybean crop residue and in modern cultivars it is limited to the lower canopy.  We’ve done extensive studies on this disease over the past decade and I have yet to attribute an economic value in managing this.  We did this one experiment where put chlorothalonil on every week (not a legal application but for research purposes only

    Issue: 2018-18
  8. Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mark Loux

    It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted – for the first and only time.  Ohio’s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).  The first step is assessing overall stand health – do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?  Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate to maximize yield.

    Issue: 2018-17
  9. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    With lower prices and higher input costs in todays soybean farming operations, some farmers are looking where to shave a few dollars off their costs of farming. Based on the calls directly from farmers on which seed treatments to use – it is not too hard to figure out where some of those savings might be coming from. This used to be general practice but there are ways to do this to be sure it really is saving farmer’s money.

    Issue: 2018-04
  10. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    Improving soybean yields in 2018 begins first with the selection of the cultivars that have the best resistance package for Ohio’s notorious pathogens and pests. Any grower that’s slacked off on the Phytophthora package gets a quick reminder of the damage that this pathogen can continually cause in a vast majority of Ohio’s production regions. Same thing with soybean cyst nematode; while the symptoms may not be present, planting a susceptible variety and getting half the yield that the neighbors got leaves some farmers scratching their heads.

    Issue: 2017-31

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