Soybean Growth and Development

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. The Western Agricultural Research Station Agronomy Field Day will be held July 17th. The station is mostly planted but everything went in on the edge – as you saw it on your farm too. Hear our researchers thoughts and recommendations on how to manage this interesting season.

    A couple of items we will walk through are:

    Issue: 2019:20
  2. R3 Stage Soybean
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    A few weeks ago, Dr. Anne Dorrance wrote an article about foliar fungicide application to soybean for control of frogeye leaf spot disease. She recommended spraying at the R3 growth stage. (Her entire article is here: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-19/we-have-found-some-whiskers-spores-cercospora-sojina).

     

    What is the R3 growth stage? And has it already passed?

     

    Issue: 2018-23
  3. Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mark Loux

    It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted – for the first and only time.  Ohio’s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).  The first step is assessing overall stand health – do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?  Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate to maximize yield.

    Issue: 2018-17
  4. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    To estimate soybean yield, four yield components need to be considered: plants per acre, pods per plant, seeds per pod, and seeds per pound (seed size).  A printable worksheet to estimate soybean yield can be found by clicking here

    Issue: 2017-29
  5. Author(s): Mark Loux , Author(s): Bill Johnson

           You would probably have to be living under a rock to not at this time be aware of the issues with off target dicamba movement affecting soybeans and other plants in the states of Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri.  The latter two states just banned any additional dicamba applications for the remainder of the growing season to avoid additional problems (subject to change probably), and some changes are coming in Tennessee also apparently.  We have seen firstha

    Issue: 2017-21
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