C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. R3 Stage Soybean
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    A few weeks ago, Dr. Anne Dorrance wrote an article about foliar fungicide application to soybean for control of frogeye leaf spot disease. She recommended spraying at the R3 growth stage. (Her entire article is here: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-19/we-have-found-some-whiskers-spores-cercospora-sojina).

     

    What is the R3 growth stage? And has it already passed?

     

    Issue: 2018-23
  2. Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mark Loux

    It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted – for the first and only time.  Ohio’s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).  The first step is assessing overall stand health – do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?  Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate to maximize yield.

    Issue: 2018-17
  3. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    To estimate soybean yield, four yield components need to be considered: plants per acre, pods per plant, seeds per pod, and seeds per pound (seed size).  A printable worksheet to estimate soybean yield can be found by clicking here

    Issue: 2017-29
  4. Author(s): Mark Loux , Author(s): Bill Johnson

           You would probably have to be living under a rock to not at this time be aware of the issues with off target dicamba movement affecting soybeans and other plants in the states of Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri.  The latter two states just banned any additional dicamba applications for the remainder of the growing season to avoid additional problems (subject to change probably), and some changes are coming in Tennessee also apparently.  We have seen firstha

    Issue: 2017-21
  5. brown, diseased emerging soybean plant. PPO and cold injury
    Author(s): Anne Dorrance , Author(s): Mark Loux

    Several calls last week with pictures of injured and/or diseased soybean seedlings.  For most of these situations we have the following scenario:  PPO herbicides (flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, saflufenacil) included as a component of the preplant burn down, fields planted 7 days later with fungicide treated seed, followed by 1 to 2 weeks of suboptimum growing conditions (between 40 to 50oF) for 2 weeks, and greater than 2” rain.  These conditions are very conducive to both Pythium damping-off and PPO injury. 

    Issue: 2017-13
  6. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Alexander Lindsey

    Saturated soils after soybean planting can cause uneven emergence and stand reductions of varying extent depending on the stage of the soybean plant and other environmental factors including temperature and duration of saturated conditions. Additionally, increased disease incidence may further reduce plant stand.

    Saturated Soil Prior to Germination: While soil moisture is necessary for germination, soybean seeds will not germinate when soils are saturated because oxygen is limiting.

    Issue: 2017-11
  7. Harvest has started in some areas of Ohio. At the Farm Science Review we have some of the crop off to allow demonstrations to begin. Field demonstrations will include soybean and corn harvest, of course; plus drones/UAVs, soil sampling, planters, precision nutrient placement and drainage installation.

    Issue: 2016-30
  8. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    June 22-23, some areas of Ohio received a significant amount of rain with some areas receiving as much as 4 to 5 inches.

    When plants are completely underwater for approximately 24-48 hours under high temperatures (>80°F), they will likely die.  Plants respire more under high temperatures, oxygen is depleted, and carbon dioxide builds up suffocating the plant.  Cool, cloudy days and cool, clear nights increase the survival of a flooded soybean crop.  If the waters recede quickly and the plants receive some light rain, they can recover.

    Issue: 2016-18
  9. Uneven Soybean Emergence
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    The soybean agronomy team is busy travelling across the state conducting stand counts on our field trials. Target stand and actual stand can vary considerably depending on planter calibration (or lack there-of), environmental conditions (i.e., soil moisture, crusting, etc), and disease/insects.

    Issue: 2016-16
  10. Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    An array of bee and fly pollinator species are found in soybean, and can enhance yield even though soybeans are self-pollinating.  I will be conducting a study this summer to identify pollinator insects in Ohio soybean and I’m looking for cooperators with appropriate field sites for insect sampling.  Fields can be conventional or organic, but cannot be planted with an insecticidal seed treatment (fungicide is okay).  The minimum field size is 500 x 500 m (about 62 acres) to be able to sample far enough away from field edges.  The sampling device is a metal stake with a “bee bowl” mounted o

    Issue: 2016-09

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