C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. frost damaged soybeans
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Soybean: Last Monday, May 16, air temperatures dropped to high 20s/low 30s causing some freeze injury to soybeans. Soybeans in low areas of the field are most likely to be affected. Plants should be assessed for damage at least five days after suspected injury to inspect for regrowth. If damage occurred above the cotyledons, the plant will likely recover. If damaged occurred below the cotyledons, the plant will not recover. Look for a discolored hypocotyl (the “crook” of the soybean that first emerges from the ground) which indicates that damage occurred below the cotyledons.

    Issue: 2016-13
  2. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Wet weather has kept many farmers (and us) out of the field.  According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, as of May 15, 10% of the soybean acres were planted.  At the same time last year, 46% of soybean planting was complete.  On average, in Ohio, the majority of soybean acres are planted mid to late May (Table 1).  Although, it is not uncommon for soybean planting to creep into June.  In general, we don’t recommend altering soybean management until planting in June.  Below are some guidelines to consider if planting soybeans in June.

    Issue: 2016-13
  3. Exact emerge planter
    Author(s): Mary Griffith

    With the ever changing weather pattern, it is critical that farmers take advantage of prime planting opportunities. Planting as efficiently as possible is one key to a successful season. Planters and technology have a come a long way in recent years. From seed singulation and uniform spacing to variable rate seeding and fertilizer application, we are working towards every seed producing its maximum yield. One of the newest planting systems is the John Deere ExactEmerge row unit, which allows planting speeds of up to 10 mph. 

    Issue: 2016-12
  4. Bee on dandilion
    Author(s): Reed Johnson , Author(s): Doug Sponsler , Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    Beekeepers in Ohio benefitted from the generally mild winter of 2015-2016.  In Columbus we lost less than 20% of our colonies over winter.  Spring is the only reliably good season for bees in Ohio.  Colonies that survived the winter and new colonies brought up from the Gulf Coast or California are currently in the process of harvesting nectar and pollen from spring-blooming trees and weeds.  Little honey will be made from this spring bounty as most will be eaten by the bees themselves as they multiply and grow into large productive colonies that will be able to make a honey crop off of clov

    Issue: 2016-11
  5. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    This “spring,” the weather has gone from snow and 24 degrees to sunny and 80 degrees within one week. This unusual weather leaves many of us wondering what’s in store for the remainder of the growing season.

    Issue: 2016-08
  6. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Planting date.  Planting date (both too early and too late) can reduce soybean yield potential.  In 2013 and 2014, we conducted a planting date trial at the Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio.  In both years, soybean yield decreased by 0.6 bu/ac per day when planting after mid-May.  (Note: Soil temperatures were >50°F at each planting date.)  The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture. 

    Issue: 2016-08
  7. Soybean Fields in Northwest Ohio June 22, 2015
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Due to wet weather, a few farmers in northwest Ohio have not yet planted soybean.  Can this soybean seed be saved and planted next year? 

    1.)  Check with your seed dealer.  Your seed dealer may have options available to return seed.  Check with your seed dealer to see what your options are.

    Issue: 2015-18
  8. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    The majority of the soybean acres in Ohio have been planted.  (According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, 85% of the soybean acres were planted by May 31.)  However, even if 5% of the soybean acres are not yet planted, with 5.1 million acres of soybean in Ohio, there are still 255,000 acres left to plant.  There are three things to consider when planting soybean in June: 1.) row width, 2.) seeding rate, and 3.) relative maturity.

    Issue: 2015-16
  9. Uneven Soybean Emergence
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Soybean planting is well underway throughout Ohio.  The USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service reported 23% of the soybean acres were planted by May 10 (and many more acres were planted between May 10 and 18) up from 13% at the same time last year.

    Issue: 2015-13
  10. Soyean planting rate chart
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Planting date.  Planting date (both too early and too late) can reduce soybean yield potential.  In 2013 and 2014, we conducted a planting date trial at the Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio.  In both years, soybean yield decreased by 0.6 bu/ac per day when planting after mid-May.  The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture. 

    Issue: 2015-09

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