C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Mark Loux

    There is obviously a lot going on with the dicamba issue, resulting in uncertainty as to where exactly we are headed with regard to future labels, restrictions, and stewardship.  However, we are fairly confident that the label for early-season use of dicamba in preplant/premeergence burndown programs will be preserved into next year at least  (“dicamba” in this article refers to the three dicamba products approved for use in Xtend soybeans – Engenia, XtendiMax and FeXapan).  Dicamba is more effective than 2,4-D on marestail in the spring, and has a good fit in burndown programs to help with

    Issue: 2017-31
  2. Palmer amaranth seedhead
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    Palmer amaranth has shown up in a few more places in Ohio this summer at a range of infestation levels, and waterhemp has also become more prevalent. Newly discovered Palmer infestations in some fields were too high to be remediated by walking fields and removing plants, although there is still some potential to mow down weeds and soybeans to prevent seed production and even bigger problems next year. Infestation level in a few other fields was low enough to allow removal of Palmer amaranth plants by a crew of concerned people.

    Issue: 2017-27
  3. Author(s): Mark Loux

    As a result of the warm winter and early spring, weed growth in no-till fields is ahead of schedule.  Fields not treated with burndown herbicides last fall or during the earlier drier period this spring can have some large weeds at this point.  Many fields need time to dry out following the most recent rains before they will tolerate traffic, which will allow weeds to get even larger and more challenging to kill.  Large marestail can be especially problematic due to the combination of glyphosate and ALS resistance in most populations.  Cool weather can reduce the activity of the herbicides

    Issue: 2017-12
  4. marestail in soybeans
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    It’s possible to find just about everything in this year’s weed control situation – cover crops that didn’t die, marestail that didn’t die, early burndown plus residual treatments that worked but are now breaking because soybeans haven’t been planted, PRE herbicides that did not or may not receive enough rain, and of course more cressleaf groundsel than in an average year.  Some comments on a few of these:

    Issue: 2016-14
  5. Palmer amaranth in soybeans
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    When you finish every possible indoor task during this rainy spell, take a few minutes and check out our latest video on pigweed identification.  The video compares four aspects of pigweed biology that we use to differentiate between redroot pigweed, waterhemp, and Palmer amaranth – pubescence, petiole length, leaf shape, and inflorescence (seedhead) characteristics.  Find it at the OSU weed management website – http://u.osu.edu/osuweeds.  There are far worse ways to spend a few minutes.

     

    Issue: 2016-11
  6. Author(s): Mark Loux

    This is a revision of an article we seem to publish in C.O.R.N. about every three years, when wet weather prevents early planting and in some cases also prevents early burndown applications.  There have been opportunities to apply burndown herbicides in much of the state over the past several weeks, and some areas have made considerable progress on planting.  Other areas have made little progress.  We are probably not in a true “late planting situation” yet, but some of the state is now wet and not that warm, and more rain coming midweek.  

    Issue: 2016-10
  7. Cover crops

    Cover crops provide multiple benefits with regards to protecting soil from erosion, improving soil health, and as a component of a nutrient management plan.  For those cover crops that over winter and resume growth in the spring, for example, cereal rye and annual ryegrass, an important question is when to terminate that cover crop.  That decision should consider the next crop, planting date of that next crop, the spring weather pattern and purpose of the cover crop.   For cover crops that have not been planted with the intention of providing a forage harvest, and that are on acres intended

    Issue: 2016-06
  8. Author(s): Mark Loux

    LibertyLink soybeans are finally starting to get the use in Ohio that they deserve.  Use of the LibertyLink system accomplishes several things - resolving current herbicide-resistant weed problems and reducing the emphasis on glyphosate use that continues to drive the development of resistant weed populations.  Our primary glyphosate weed problems in the state are still marestail, giant ragweed, and common ragweed.  Waterhemp problems are slowly increasing and Palmer amaranth is showing up here and there.  Glyphosate resistance in these species often occurs in conjunction with site 2 resist

    Issue: 2016-05
  9. Author(s): Mark Loux

    The C.O.R.N.

    Issue: 2015-31
  10. Palmer Amaranth seed head
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    The frequency of Palmer amaranth infestations in Ohio has been holding relatively steady again into this year.  We have mostly an isolated field or patch in about 10 counties, with the exception of two small epicenters of Palmer amaranth - far southern Scioto County and an area along the Madison-Fayette County line north of Jeffersonville.  Several new infestations of Palmer amaranth in soybeans have been reported over the past several weeks though.  It was also found in a first-year hayfield, where cutting and competition from the alfalfa/grass stand will likely keep it under control in co

    Issue: 2015-27

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