C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Mark Badertscher

    Are you thinking about switching to no-till and have some questions you need answered before taking the leap?  Maybe you‘ve been planting no-till soybeans for years and are thinking about adapting this practice to corn.  Adopting no-till requires understanding how it affects drainage, soil structure, organic matter, weed control, and the application of pesticides and chemical fertilizers, all of which influence both yields and environmental impacts.

    Issue: 2016-26
  2. The primary causes of grain spoilage during storage are excess moisture and high temperature. However, insects can infest any grain that is not handled properly or that is stored longer than 6 months. Damage from weevils or other stored grain insects can be costly. Unfortunately, they often are discovered when grain is being taken out of the bin. At that point, the damage has been done and there are few control options.

    Issue: 2016-26
  3. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    Sudden death syndrome.  I was scouting the sudden death syndrome study and symptoms have started.  And due to the calls I am getting it is also in some producer’s fields.  Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a fungal disease of soybean and is limited to a few locations in Ohio.  Interestingly, these fields where SDS occurs in Ohio, also have high SCN populations.  These two culprits often appear together.  The fungus is now called Fusarium virguliforme and colonizes the tap root and roots so they turn dark in color.  After the rains last week, it may be possible to obse

    Issue: 2016-26
  4. Author(s): Anne Dorrance

    Late reports of frogeye developing on susceptible cultivars in southern Ohio.  So the next question is what to do.  During 2005-2008, we were able to measure a mean difference in yield of 5 to 10 bu/A when soybeans were treated at R3 in fields where frogeye was present.  We have also been able to measure a greater yield difference on highly susceptible varieties when frogeye was present during the early flowering stages.  However, last year, when frogeye was less than 1 spot per 40’ on a moderately susceptible variety, and the conditions were very dry and warm over the next 2 weeks, we coul

    Issue: 2016-24
  5. Agronomists , CCAs and custom applicators are invited to the Farm Science Review Agronomy College, hosted by the Ohio AgriBusiness Association in partnership with Ohio State University Extension and the Farm Science Review staff. The program will bring industry experts, OSU researchers, and agronomy service providers together to enhance collective knowledge and learning at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio, on Sept. 13 - one week before the start of the annual three-day farm show.

    Issue: 2016-24
  6. Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Reed Johnson

    Although soybean aphids remain at low levels in Ohio, we are aware that many growers are adding insecticides to spray tanks when applying fungicides for plant health purposes and even late applications of herbicides because: “Well, I’m going over the field anyway so I thought I’d add an insecticide for insurance purposes! The insecticide is relatively cheap and soybeans are worth so much!” As we have always stated, we do NOT recommend this practice, and feel an IPM approach is much better for everyone and everything, including the environment.

    Issue: 2016-23
  7. Author(s): Kelley Tilmon , Author(s): Andy Michel

    With continued dry weather, the pest we’ve been getting the most calls about is the spider mite.  This is just a reminder that vigilant scouting for this pest is a good idea right now.  It is also important to re-scout 5 days after treatment because many products will not kill the eggs, and populations can resurge.  Any nescessary followup treatment should be made with a product with a different mode of action to reduce resistance development (so, for example, if you used something with bifenthrin the first time, you might switch to Lorsban the second time, or vice versa).  This link will t

    Issue: 2016-23
  8. frost damaged soybeans
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Peter Thomison

    Soybean: Last Monday, May 16, air temperatures dropped to high 20s/low 30s causing some freeze injury to soybeans. Soybeans in low areas of the field are most likely to be affected. Plants should be assessed for damage at least five days after suspected injury to inspect for regrowth. If damage occurred above the cotyledons, the plant will likely recover. If damaged occurred below the cotyledons, the plant will not recover. Look for a discolored hypocotyl (the “crook” of the soybean that first emerges from the ground) which indicates that damage occurred below the cotyledons.

    Issue: 2016-13
  9. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Wet weather has kept many farmers (and us) out of the field.  According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, as of May 15, 10% of the soybean acres were planted.  At the same time last year, 46% of soybean planting was complete.  On average, in Ohio, the majority of soybean acres are planted mid to late May (Table 1).  Although, it is not uncommon for soybean planting to creep into June.  In general, we don’t recommend altering soybean management until planting in June.  Below are some guidelines to consider if planting soybeans in June.

    Issue: 2016-13
  10. cereal leaf beetle feeding in wheat
    Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    With much of the state still yet to plant, growers should be keep a few insect pests in mind as they get in into fields this week:

    Issue: 2016-12

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