Weed Control

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Mark Loux , Author(s): Curtis Young, CCA

    Poison hemlock remains one of the more persistent and prevalent poisonous weeds that we deal with in Ohio.  It's most typically a biennial plant (sometimes perennial), emerging from seed in year one and developing into a low-growing rosette by late fall.  The rosette overwinters and then resumes growth in the spring of year two.  Stem elongation initiates sooner in spring than many other biennials, and this is followed by continued growth and development into the often very tall plant with substantial overall size.  Flowering and seed production occur in summer. 

    Issue: 2020-07
  2. Author(s): Mark Loux

    According to our network of sources, the effectiveness of new soybean trait systems has some growers once again thinking about omitting preemergence residual herbicides from their weed management programs.  Some people apparently need to learn the same lessons over and over again.  Having gone through this once in the early 2000’s when Roundup Ready soybeans had taken over and we all sprayed only glyphosate all day every day, we think we’re pretty sure where it leads.  We’re sensitive to concerns about the cost of production, but the cost-benefit analysis for residual herbicides is way in t

    Issue: 2020-05
  3. Herbicide Classification
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    The USB Take Action initiative and university weed scientists have developed a free webinar series covering various weed and herbicide management issues.  The webinar occurs every Thursday at 11 am EST through March 26.  Each webinar will have two weed scientists giving presentations about 15 minutes long, and there is opportunity for viewers to ask questions via the web portal.  The schedule is as follows:

    Feb 20

    Aaron Hager, University of Illinois – effective long-term management of waterhemp

    Travis Legleiter, University of Kentucky – spray deposition factors 

    Issue: 2020-04
  4. Winter annuals
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    If you have never applied herbicide in fall to burn down winter annuals, or done it only infrequently, this might be the year to make an investment in fall herbicides.  Fall treatments are an integral component of marestail management programs.  They also prevent problems with dense mats of winter annuals in the spring, which can prevent soil from drying out and warming up, interfere with tillage and planting, and harbor insects and soybean cyst nematode.  2019 was a generally tough year for weed control, leading to higher end of season weed populations in some fields.  A number of acres we

    Issue: 2019 - 33
  5. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Information on preharvest herbicide treatments for field corn and soybeans can be found in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois”, at the end of these crop sections (pages 74 and 141 of the 2019 edition).  Products labeled for corn include Aim, glyphosate, and paraquat.  Products listed in the guide for soybeans include Aim, paraquat, glyphosate, and Sharpen.  Some dicamba products are also approved for preharvest use in all types of soybeans, which escaped our notice until now, so it is not listed in the guide.  The basic information for preharvest dicamba (for 4 lb./gal

    Issue: 2019 - 30

Publications

  1. 12/2020

    Ohio, Indiana and Illinois Weed Control Guide, Bulletin 789. Publication gives detailed guidance on weed control selections. Numerous tables by crop and application help producers select the best product option for their weed control situation. Hard copy and PDF available for purchase

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