Weeds

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Mark Loux

    The maps that accompany this article show our current knowledge of waterhemp and Palmer amaranth distribution in Ohio.  These are based on information from a survey of OSU Extension County Educators, along with information we had from samples submitted, direct contacts, etc.  We still consider any new introductions of Palmer amaranth to be from an external source (brought in from outside Ohio) – hay or feed, infested equipment, CRP/cover/wildlife seedings.  Palmer is not really spreading around the state, and as the map shows, we have had a number of introductions that were immediately reme

    Issue: 2020-18
  2. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Weed populations are constantly shifting, in response to the pressure from our cultural and herbicide use practices, and how good our management of weeds is (or isn’t).  Two weeks ago in CORN, we wrote about the apparent decline in marestail in parts of the state, although in subsequent communication we heard fairly clearly that not everyone’s populations had declined yet.  And there is bad news - waterhemp is spreading at a rapid rate, and it’s a considerably more challenging pest than marestail for several reasons.  The question really is – why has waterhemp taken off over the past severa

    Issue: 2019-12
  3. Author(s): Mark Loux

    For the second year in a row, we are scrounging to find enough marestail at the OARDC Western Ag Station to conduct the research we had planned on this weed.  After years of having plenty of marestail, we have had to look around for off-site fields where there is still a high enough population.  Which, since we are scientists after all, or at least make our best attempts, left us thinking about reasons for the lack of marestail, and our overall maresta

    Issue: 2019-10
  4. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Having to issue a retraction to previous C.O.R.N.

    Issue: 2019-05
  5. cereal rye cover crop
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    OSU weed scientists are in the process of planning cover crop research, and could use your input. Cover crop use has been on the rise in recent years, most commonly for the preservation of soil, reduction in nutrient loss, and suppression of weeds they can provide. Feedback from this survey will allow us to perform trials that are in line with practices common in the state of Ohio and thus generate more impactful results. Thank you!

    Please take our five second survey!

    Issue: 2018-23

Publications

  1. 12/2020

    Ohio, Indiana and Illinois Weed Control Guide, Bulletin 789. Publication gives detailed guidance on weed control selections. Numerous tables by crop and application help producers select the best product option for their weed control situation. Hard copy and PDF available for purchase

Subscribe to RSS - Weeds