C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Weed populations are constantly shifting, in response to the pressure from our cultural and herbicide use practices, and how good our management of weeds is (or isn’t).  Two weeks ago in CORN, we wrote about the apparent decline in marestail in parts of the state, although in subsequent communication we heard fairly clearly that not everyone’s populations had declined yet.  And there is bad news - waterhemp is spreading at a rapid rate, and it’s a considerably more challenging pest than marestail for several reasons.  The question really is – why has waterhemp taken off over the past severa

    Issue: 2019-12
  2. Author(s): Mark Loux

    For the second year in a row, we are scrounging to find enough marestail at the OARDC Western Ag Station to conduct the research we had planned on this weed.  After years of having plenty of marestail, we have had to look around for off-site fields where there is still a high enough population.  Which, since we are scientists after all, or at least make our best attempts, left us thinking about reasons for the lack of marestail, and our overall maresta

    Issue: 2019-10
  3. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Having to issue a retraction to previous C.O.R.N.

    Issue: 2019-05
  4. cereal rye cover crop
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    OSU weed scientists are in the process of planning cover crop research, and could use your input. Cover crop use has been on the rise in recent years, most commonly for the preservation of soil, reduction in nutrient loss, and suppression of weeds they can provide. Feedback from this survey will allow us to perform trials that are in line with practices common in the state of Ohio and thus generate more impactful results. Thank you!

    Please take our five second survey!

    Issue: 2018-23
  5. Seed heads of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    If you don’t already have to deal with waterhemp or Palmer amaranth, you don’t want it.  Ask anyone who does.  Neither one of these weeds is easy to manage, and both can cause substantial increases in the cost of herbicide programs, which have to be constantly changed to account for the multiple resistance that will develop over time (not “can”, “will”).  The trend across the country is for them to develop resistance to any new herbicide sites of action that are used in POST treatments.  Preventing new infestations of these weeds should be of high priority for Ohio growers.  When not adequa

    Issue: 2018-23
  6. Author(s): Mark Loux

    This is the time of year when we received our first call about dicamba problems in soybeans in 2017.  We can probably expect any problems to become evident soon, based on the timing of postemergence applications and timeline for development of symptoms.  Off-target issues have already developed in states farther west and south, and we would expect at least some to occur here, unless we’re really lucky.

    Issue: 2018-19
  7. Cressleaf Groundsel. Source: S. Noggle, 2017
    Author(s): Sarah Noggle

    Many questions come into the County Extension Office daily.  Many times those include a question about a weed identification.  During the month of June 2018, OSU Extension will be featuring a weed identification of the week.  This week's weed is cressleaf groundsel, Senecio glabellus. 

    Issue: 2018-16
  8. Author(s): Cindy Folck

    Do you know the weather conditions that contribute to inversions? A workshop on April 10 will focus on tools to help farmers recognize inversions and other weather conditions that affect drift. Aaron Wilson, weather specialist and atmospheric scientist, will discuss weather trends and how to recognize inversions. Additionally, workshop attendees will learn about the new tools available through the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry by Field Watch to increase communication between field crop and specialty crop growers.

    Issue: 2018-07
  9. Author(s): Mark Loux

    We have had reports of dodder in some red clover fields.  Dodder is a parasitic plant without any leaves or chlorophyll to produce its own energy.  It lives by attaching to a host with small appendages (called ‘haustoria”), and extracting the host plant’s carbohydrates. The stems are yellow-orange, stringlike, twining, smooth and branching to form dense masses in infested fields.  Although neither toxic nor unpalatable to some livestock, dodder can weaken host plants enough to reduce yield, quality, and stand.  If infestations are severe enough, dodder may kill host plants.  

    Issue: 2017-34
  10. Palmer amaranth seedhead
    Author(s): Mark Loux

    Palmer amaranth has shown up in a few more places in Ohio this summer at a range of infestation levels, and waterhemp has also become more prevalent. Newly discovered Palmer infestations in some fields were too high to be remediated by walking fields and removing plants, although there is still some potential to mow down weeds and soybeans to prevent seed production and even bigger problems next year. Infestation level in a few other fields was low enough to allow removal of Palmer amaranth plants by a crew of concerned people.

    Issue: 2017-27

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