Wheat

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Wheat field
    Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mike Estadt

    The National Wheat Yield Contest was created in 2015 by the National Wheat Foundation to promote new ideas and experimentation for wheat production, enable knowledge transfer between growers and identify top wheat producers in each state.  Since its short inception, Ohio has had good participation in the national contest, ranking second in entries in 2021 to Kansas. While your wheat crop may not be looking quite as good as it did in 2021, we encourage producers to improve their knowledge of wheat production as a result of participating in the 2022 contest.

    Issue: 2022-09
  2. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Between planting in the fall and Feekes 4 growth stage (beginning of erect growth) in the spring, winter wheat is vulnerable to environmental stress such as saturated soils and freeze-thaw cycles that cause soil heaving. All of which may lead to substantial stand reduction, and consequently, low grain yield. This year, many areas of Ohio have been wet and wheat plants look poor. However, a stand that looks thin in the spring does not always correspond to low grain yield.

    Issue: 2022-07
  3. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Is spring wheat an option for Ohio farmers? Yes, we can grow spring wheat in Ohio, but spring wheat yield will be significantly lower than winter wheat yield.

    Issue: 2022-06
  4. Author(s): Amanda Douridas

    Whether it’s been a while since you’ve grown wheat or been a while since you have evaluated a wheat field, it is time to freshen up on how to do so. Even if you’re considering growing wheat for the first time, this event will get you started off on the right foot.

    Issue: 2022-05
  5. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    In general, the best time to plant wheat is the 10-day period starting the day after the fly-free safe date. When wheat is planted more than 10-days after the fly-free safe date, there is anwheat planting date increased chance of reduced fall growth and reduced winterhardiness. The effect of planting date on wheat yield is shown in Figure 6-2 of the Ohio Agronomy Guide.

    Issue: 2021-35

Publications

  1. Wheat Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 785. Effective disease management requires knowledge of the important yield-limiting diseases most likely to occur in Ohio. This bulletin addresses the essential components of the disease symptoms with color images, the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting wheat in Ohio.

  2. Improving Wheat Profits in Ohio, Bulletin 938. This bulletin provides an up-to-date description of products and practices that reduce production costs and increase wheat yields and profits. Each topic follows a "bolt & nut approach'' to crop management and is presented and illustrated in an easily understood format.

  3. 06/2019

    Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide, Bulletin 827.Looking for a handy guide to take to the field to diagnosis various pest and production problems? This guide is the answer! You will want one of these guides in the truck and maybe a second in the tractor.

  4. 04/2017

    Ohio Agronomy Guide 15th Edition, Bulletin 472. The newly revised Ohio Agronomy Guide serves as the official compilation of adaptive results and recommendations from research and educational programs. Described in this manual is information on Ohio's climate and soil, soil and water management, soil fertility, and corn, small grain, and forage crop production and management. Also, seed evaluation and weed control for the previously listed crops are discussed.

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