Wheat

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Hessian Fly Safe Dates for Ohio counties
    Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Kelley Tilmon

    The cold temperatures this week reminded us that we are approaching our fly-free date for Ohio. These
    dates are based on predictions on when most Hessian fly adults would no longer be alive to lay eggs on
    emerging wheat. Planting winter crops after this date is a good practice to prevent infestations. Areas
    of Northern Ohio can safely plant wheat after September 22, whereas the dates in southern Ohio extend
    to October 4 and 5.

    Issue: 2020-31
  2. Author(s): Mark Loux

    Herbicide options for burndown of existing weeds prior to planting of no-till wheat include glyphosate, Gramoxone, Sharpen, and dicamba.  Among these, the combination of glyphosate and Sharpen probably provides the best combination of efficacy on marestail, flexibility in application timing and residual control.  Dicamba labels have the following restriction on preplant applications – “allow 10 days between application and planting for each 0.25 lb ai/A used”.  A rate of 0.5 lb ai/A would therefore need to be applied at least 20 days before planting.  We do not know of any 2,4-D product lab

    Issue: 2020 - 30
  3. Hessian Fly Safe Dates for Ohio counties
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA , Author(s): Steve Culman

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn. With soybean harvest quickly approaching, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful crop.

    Issue: 2020 - 30
  4. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Matthew Hankinson

    Yield results for the 2020 Ohio Wheat Performance Test are online at: https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/wheattrials/default.asp?year=2020

    Issue: 2020-24
  5. Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Between planting in the fall and Feekes 4 growth stage (beginning of erect growth) in the spring, winter wheat is vulnerable to environmental stress such as saturated soils and freeze-thaw cycles that cause soil heaving. All of which may lead to substantial stand reduction, and consequently, low grain yield. However, a stand that looks thin in the spring does not always correspond to lower grain yield. Rather than relying on a visual assessment, we suggest counting the number of wheat stems or using the mobile phone app (Canopeo) to estimate wheat grain yield.

    Issue: 2020-06

Publications

  1. Wheat Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 785. Effective disease management requires knowledge of the important yield-limiting diseases most likely to occur in Ohio. This bulletin addresses the essential components of the disease symptoms with color images, the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting wheat in Ohio.

  2. Improving Wheat Profits in Ohio, Bulletin 938. This bulletin provides an up-to-date description of products and practices that reduce production costs and increase wheat yields and profits. Each topic follows a "bolt & nut approach'' to crop management and is presented and illustrated in an easily understood format.

  3. 06/2019

    Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide, Bulletin 827.Looking for a handy guide to take to the field to diagnosis various pest and production problems? This guide is the answer! You will want one of these guides in the truck and maybe a second in the tractor.

  4. 04/2017

    Ohio Agronomy Guide 15th Edition, Bulletin 472. The newly revised Ohio Agronomy Guide serves as the official compilation of adaptive results and recommendations from research and educational programs. Described in this manual is information on Ohio's climate and soil, soil and water management, soil fertility, and corn, small grain, and forage crop production and management. Also, seed evaluation and weed control for the previously listed crops are discussed.

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