Wheat Disease

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    In northern Ohio, most of the wheat fields are between Feekes growth stages 9 (full flag leaf emergence) and 10 (boot), with the odd early-planted field or field planted with an early- maturing variety beginning to head-out. In southern Ohio, fields are between Feekes 10 and early flowering (Feekes 10.5.1).

    Issue: 2019-14
  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    What should I spray for scab and vomitoxin control? With the addition of Miravis Ace (a new DMI + SDHI premix) to the list of fungicides recommended for the control of Fusarium head blight (head scab) and vomitoxin in wheat and barley, questions are being asked as to whether it is any better than Prosaro and Caramba. In 2018, we compared the three fungicides on scab susceptible varieties across 12 environments and found that in terms of efficacy against head scab and vomitoxin, Prosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace were very comparable.

    Issue: 2019-14
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Some Ohio wheat growers are thinking about planting wheat after corn to avoid some of the late planting issues we have had to deal with over the past few years. Indeed, timely planting will result in good stand establishment (more tillers per foot of row) and reduce the risk of winter kill. However, planting wheat after corn to ensure that the crop is planted early enough has disadvantages.

    Issue: 2018-34
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    More rain is in the forecast for later this week as wheat fields in the northern half of the state go through the flowering growth stage. Fields flowering today (May 30) are at low risk for scab in the northwestern corner of the state, but the risk will increase progressively later in the week as tropical storm Alberto comes through (see maps for May 30 through June 1 below). Fields in the southern third of the state are now at much less susceptible growth stages for infection by the scab fungus.

    Issue: 2018-15
  5. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    For those fields of wheat flowering and fields of barley head-out today (May 22), the risk for head scab is moderate in the northern-most counties and in the eastern portion of central Ohio (according to the scab forecasting system at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu). Persistent rainfall and high relative humidity over the last several days are the primary reasons for the moderate-risk prediction in these regions.

    Issue: 2018-14

Publications

  1. Wheat Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 785. Effective disease management requires knowledge of the important yield-limiting diseases most likely to occur in Ohio. This bulletin addresses the essential components of the disease symptoms with color images, the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting wheat in Ohio.

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