Wheat Disease

C.O.R.N. Newsletter Articles

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    More rain is in the forecast for later this week as wheat fields in the northern half of the state go through the flowering growth stage. Fields flowering today (May 30) are at low risk for scab in the northwestern corner of the state, but the risk will increase progressively later in the week as tropical storm Alberto comes through (see maps for May 30 through June 1 below). Fields in the southern third of the state are now at much less susceptible growth stages for infection by the scab fungus.

    Issue: 2018-15
  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    For those fields of wheat flowering and fields of barley head-out today (May 22), the risk for head scab is moderate in the northern-most counties and in the eastern portion of central Ohio (according to the scab forecasting system at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu). Persistent rainfall and high relative humidity over the last several days are the primary reasons for the moderate-risk prediction in these regions.

    Issue: 2018-14
  3. Septoria, wheat
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    It is wet and rainy outside and the forecast calls for more rain throughout this the second week of May (May 14–19). Therefore, growers’ concerns about diseases and the need for fungicides are understandable. However, although most of our common diseases of small grain crops are favored by wet, humid conditions, it does not automatically mean that you have to apply a fungicide this week.

    Issue: 2018-13
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Clay Sneller , Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Even though we did not have high levels of scab and vomitoxin this year, we still need to keep this disease in our minds as we select varieties to plant this fall. In the past, there were very few Ohio-grown winter wheat varieties with decent scab resistance, and some of those varieties yielded poorly or did not grew well under our conditions. Today we have far more varieties with very good scab resistance in combination with very good yield potential. So, as you prepare to plant wheat this fall, scab resistance should be a top priority on your list when selecting a variety.

    Issue: 2017-29
  5. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn and provides an ideal time to apply fertilizer in July/August after harvest. With soybean harvest around the corner, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful crop.

    Issue: 2017-29

Publications

  1. Wheat Disease Management in Ohio, Bulletin 785. Effective disease management requires knowledge of the important yield-limiting diseases most likely to occur in Ohio. This bulletin addresses the essential components of the disease symptoms with color images, the environmental factors favoring the disease, the method of transmission and infection, and management options for the major diseases affecting wheat in Ohio.

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