C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Clay Sneller , Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Even though we did not have high levels of scab and vomitoxin this year, we still need to keep this disease in our minds as we select varieties to plant this fall. In the past, there were very few Ohio-grown winter wheat varieties with decent scab resistance, and some of those varieties yielded poorly or did not grew well under our conditions. Today we have far more varieties with very good scab resistance in combination with very good yield potential. So, as you prepare to plant wheat this fall, scab resistance should be a top priority on your list when selecting a variety.

    Issue: 2017-29
  2. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn and provides an ideal time to apply fertilizer in July/August after harvest. With soybean harvest around the corner, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful crop.

    Issue: 2017-29
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Jorge David Salgado

    Wheat is now flowering in parts of northern Ohio and will continue to flower over the next weeks of so. According to the FHB forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/), the risk for scab is low in central and northern Ohio for fields flowering at this time. Although it has rained over the last 2-4 days in parts of the flowering regions, conditions were relatively cool and dry last week, which likely reduced the risk of the scab fungus infecting the wheat spikes.

    Issue: 2017-14
  4. The OARDC Schaffter Farm located at 3240 Oil City Rd., Wooster, will be the host location for the 2017 Small Grains Field Day scheduled for Tuesday, June 13.  Registration is now being accepted for the event which runs from 9:30 am and concluding around 3:15 pm.   In addition to looking at how small grains are used as a grain crop the field day will also provide information and demonstrations about wheat quality and use in food products, small grains as cover crops, alternative forages, and how small grains fit into row cropping systems.   Participants will have the opportunity to walk thro

    Issue: 2017-14
  5. field day
    Author(s): Amanda Douridas

    Join specialists in the field this summer to see hands on what insect and disease pressure is present. The specialists will help participants identify insects and diseases and then discuss management strategies. The series begins with a Pasture Walk on May 23 at 5:30 pm. The field borders the Ohio Caverns so an optional group tour of the Caverns has been set up at 4pm ($15).

    Issue: 2017-12
  6. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Last year, wheat winter progressed quicker than usual due to warm temperatures. In our Pickaway County trials in 2016, wheat reached Feekes growth stage 6.0 by April 6. This year, with unusually warm temperatures, we may see something similar. Don’t rely on calendar date. Check your fields for growth stage.

    Issue: 2017-05
  7. Purple Wheat
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Alexander Lindsey , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Steve Culman , Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    Some farmers in northwest Ohio have noted purple-reddish leaves on their wheat crop (see picture). If your wheat plants turned purple, here are a couple of things to note:

    Issue: 2016-39
  8. fusarium head blight prediction center
    Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Jorge David Salgado

    Wheat is now flowering in parts of central Ohio and will continue to flower in more northern counties later this week and into next week. According to the FHB forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/), the risk for scab is low in central and northern Ohio for fields flowering at this time (May 23). Although it has rained fairly consistently over the last 7-14 days, conditions were relatively cool last week, which likely reduced the risk of the scab fungus infecting the wheat spikes.

    Issue: 2016-13
  9. scab prediction center
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Is it still worth putting on a fungicide? If so, what would be the best time to put it on? Via phone, email, or in person, these have been the most frequently asked questions over the last 5 days. The short and simple answer is “it depends”. Some fields have been hit by stripe rust while others have been hit by freezing temperatures, all within the last 7 day. Understandably, most people were planning to hold off on making a fungicide application until flowering (anthesis: Feekes 10.5.1) to get the best control of head scab and vomitoxin.

    Issue: 2016-12
  10. Leaf rust
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Last Thursday I received reports of, and confirmed through pictures, stripe rust in southern Ohio. Reports coming in today suggest that the disease has since spread and may even be increasing in severity. This is very early for Ohio and is a cause for concern, especially since this disease develops best and spreads quickly under cool, rainy conditions, similar to what we have had over the last few weeks and will likely continue to have this week.

    Issue: 2016-11

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