C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    In northern Ohio, most of the wheat fields are between Feekes growth stages 9 (full flag leaf emergence) and 10 (boot), with the odd early-planted field or field planted with an early- maturing variety beginning to head-out. In southern Ohio, fields are between Feekes 10 and early flowering (Feekes 10.5.1).

    Issue: 2019-14
  2. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    What should I spray for scab and vomitoxin control? With the addition of Miravis Ace (a new DMI + SDHI premix) to the list of fungicides recommended for the control of Fusarium head blight (head scab) and vomitoxin in wheat and barley, questions are being asked as to whether it is any better than Prosaro and Caramba. In 2018, we compared the three fungicides on scab susceptible varieties across 12 environments and found that in terms of efficacy against head scab and vomitoxin, Prosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace were very comparable.

    Issue: 2019-14
  3. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Some Ohio wheat growers are thinking about planting wheat after corn to avoid some of the late planting issues we have had to deal with over the past few years. Indeed, timely planting will result in good stand establishment (more tillers per foot of row) and reduce the risk of winter kill. However, planting wheat after corn to ensure that the crop is planted early enough has disadvantages.

    Issue: 2018-34
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    More rain is in the forecast for later this week as wheat fields in the northern half of the state go through the flowering growth stage. Fields flowering today (May 30) are at low risk for scab in the northwestern corner of the state, but the risk will increase progressively later in the week as tropical storm Alberto comes through (see maps for May 30 through June 1 below). Fields in the southern third of the state are now at much less susceptible growth stages for infection by the scab fungus.

    Issue: 2018-15
  5. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    For those fields of wheat flowering and fields of barley head-out today (May 22), the risk for head scab is moderate in the northern-most counties and in the eastern portion of central Ohio (according to the scab forecasting system at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu). Persistent rainfall and high relative humidity over the last several days are the primary reasons for the moderate-risk prediction in these regions.

    Issue: 2018-14
  6. Septoria, wheat
    Author(s): Pierce Paul

    It is wet and rainy outside and the forecast calls for more rain throughout this the second week of May (May 14–19). Therefore, growers’ concerns about diseases and the need for fungicides are understandable. However, although most of our common diseases of small grain crops are favored by wet, humid conditions, it does not automatically mean that you have to apply a fungicide this week.

    Issue: 2018-13
  7. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Clay Sneller , Author(s): Laura Lindsey

    Even though we did not have high levels of scab and vomitoxin this year, we still need to keep this disease in our minds as we select varieties to plant this fall. In the past, there were very few Ohio-grown winter wheat varieties with decent scab resistance, and some of those varieties yielded poorly or did not grew well under our conditions. Today we have far more varieties with very good scab resistance in combination with very good yield potential. So, as you prepare to plant wheat this fall, scab resistance should be a top priority on your list when selecting a variety.

    Issue: 2017-29
  8. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn and provides an ideal time to apply fertilizer in July/August after harvest. With soybean harvest around the corner, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful crop.

    Issue: 2017-29
  9. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Jorge David Salgado

    Wheat is now flowering in parts of northern Ohio and will continue to flower over the next weeks of so. According to the FHB forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/), the risk for scab is low in central and northern Ohio for fields flowering at this time. Although it has rained over the last 2-4 days in parts of the flowering regions, conditions were relatively cool and dry last week, which likely reduced the risk of the scab fungus infecting the wheat spikes.

    Issue: 2017-14
  10. The OARDC Schaffter Farm located at 3240 Oil City Rd., Wooster, will be the host location for the 2017 Small Grains Field Day scheduled for Tuesday, June 13.  Registration is now being accepted for the event which runs from 9:30 am and concluding around 3:15 pm.   In addition to looking at how small grains are used as a grain crop the field day will also provide information and demonstrations about wheat quality and use in food products, small grains as cover crops, alternative forages, and how small grains fit into row cropping systems.   Participants will have the opportunity to walk thro

    Issue: 2017-14

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