C.O.R.N. Newsletter

  1. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA , Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    Growers are interested in wide-row wheat production due to changes in equipment inventory (lack of grain drill and availability of air seeder) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. Wheat row spacing work was conducted during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 growing seasons with funding from the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program and Michigan Wheat Program. Overall, wheat grown in 15-inch row widths yielded 1 to 11% lower compared to wheat grown in 7.5-inch row widths.

    If you are planting wheat in 15-inch rows, consider the following:

    Issue: 2017-30
  2. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn and provides an ideal time to apply fertilizer in July/August after harvest. With soybean harvest around the corner, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful crop.

    Issue: 2017-29
  3. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA , Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA

    Growers may be interested in wide-row wheat production due to reductions in equipment inventory (lack of grain drill) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. With funding from the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program and the Michigan Wheat Program, we’ve conducted several wide-row wheat trials.

    Issue: 2016-30
  4. Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA , Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Clay Sneller

    Among the questions that we have had to answer thus far this season as we get ready to plant wheat are:

    1- What are the real dangers of planting wheat after wheat?

    2- Now that we have an excellent group of fungicides, can we get away with planting wheat after wheat?

    Issue: 2016-28
  5. Author(s): Greg LaBarge, CCA

    There are three excellent field day opportunities being planned for small grain producers across the state. The three days cover a variety of production issues, nutrient management practices, and small grain uses. Locations are in Pickaway, Wayne and Wood Counties. Be sure to check out the location closest to you! For detailed information visit: https://agcrops.osu.edu/events

    June 1, Pickaway County, On-Farm Wheat Field Day, 19076 Florence Chapel Pike, Circleville at 9 am.

    Issue: 2016-11
  6. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Mike Estadt

    On June 1, we will be having an on-farm wheat field day in Pickaway County near Circleville at the site of our Ohio Wheat Performance Test and other agronomic wheat trials. Click here for more information.

    Registration is free, but we are requesting registration by Friday, May 20 for lunch count. Lunch will be held at Jackson Township Hall. Please register through the Pickaway County Extension office (740-474-7534 or estadt.3@osu.edu).   

    Issue: 2016-10
  7. Crawford, Pickaway, Wood County Wheat Seeding Rate Trials
    Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Pierce Paul , Author(s): Ed Lentz, CCA

    Wheat helps reduce problems associated with the continuous planting of soybean and corn and provides an ideal time to apply fertilizer and manure, condition the field, and plant cover crops after harvest. With soybean harvest beginning, we would like to remind farmers of a few management decisions that are important for a successful wheat crop.

    Issue: 2015-29
  8. Hessian Fly-free Date by County
    Author(s): Andy Michel , Author(s): Pierce Paul

    A good rule of thumb for planting wheat is to wait after the Hessian fly-free date.  These dates are predictions on when most Hessian fly adults would no longer be alive and lay eggs in wheat fields.  If planted too early, the eggs can hatch and stunt or kill the wheat plants. Keep in mind that this date is also good for cover crops as well, as mentioned by the Penn St.

    Issue: 2015-29
  9. Author(s): Laura Lindsey , Author(s): Eric Richer, CCA , Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Growers are interested in wide-row wheat production due to reductions in equipment inventory (i.e., lack of grain drill) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. With funding from the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program and the Michigan Wheat Program, we’ve conducted row width trials to examine variety selection and seeding rate. Here are some considerations if you plan on growing wheat in wide rows this fall:

    Issue: 2015-27
  10. Author(s): Pierce Paul

    Q: What if I plant scabby wheat for grain or use it as a cover crop?

    Issue: 2015-27

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